Kids Still Over-Sharing Online; Fears Bring Calls for Mandatory Privacy Education and Digital Literacy Programs in Schools from an Early Age

The Daily Mercury (Mackay, Australia), February 4, 2017 | Go to article overview

Kids Still Over-Sharing Online; Fears Bring Calls for Mandatory Privacy Education and Digital Literacy Programs in Schools from an Early Age


Byline: LANAI SCARR

THE PLATFORMS

Top five social media services used by kids and teens are:

Kids (8-13 years): YouTube 66%, Facebook 56%, Instagram 53%, Snapchat 30%, Skype 25%

Teens (14-17 years): Facebook 90%, YouTube 70%, Instagram 58%, Snapchat 57%, Skype 34%

On average, kids have two active social media accounts

Facebook is the main social media account for both kids and teens- for 38% of kids, 56% of teens it's the top account

More than half of young social media users use privacy settings on their main social media accounts.

61% set their accounts to private

21% have partially private settings

10% are unsure about their privacy settings

9% set their accounts to public

More teens share personal information on their main social media account than kids do.

Photo of face: 58% of teens vs. 47% of kids

Surname: 45% of teens vs. 27% of kids

Real age: 38% of teens vs. 21% kids

School/ photo of uniform: 27% of teens vs. 19% kids

Phone number/ street address: 9% of teens vs. 6% kids.

Young people on upsides and downsides of social media:

The upsides: Keeping connected to family and friends 76%, Entertainment 69%, Keeping up to date 45%, Planning social life 30%, Self-expression 26%

The downsides: Nasty comments 45%, Inappropriate or hurtful content 36%, Nothing 30%, Feeling they have to keep checking it 23%, FOMO (fear of missing out) 18%

This survey was commissioned by the Office of the Children's eSafety Commissioner, June 2016, using a sample size of 2278 young people aged 8 to 17 years, with access to the internet. Of that sample, this survey focused on a base of 1210 young people, who use social media.

CHILDREN as young as eight are sharing their home address, phone number and surname on open social media platforms as experts call for mandatory education in schools to warn of the dangers of over-sharing online.

News Corp Australia has obtained exclusive new data from the Office of the Children's E-Safety commissioner that shows kids are putting themselves at huge digital risk.

The Young and Social Online research shows 39% of children as young as eight, who use social media, have shared their real surname on their accounts, 24% have posted a photo of their school or school uniform and alarmingly 8% have shared their phone number and/or street address.

Teens are also turning to more "dark social" platforms such as Snapchat which are providing a false sense of security that their information will be safe because it disappears after a certain defined time frame.

The research of 2278 teens and pre-teens conducted by the office of the Children's E-Safety Commissioner and provided exclusively to News Corp Australia also showed Facebook is still proving to be the platform of choice for young people with 90% of 14 to 17-year-olds using the service on a regular basis.

An alarming 56% of kids aged eight to 13 also say they are circumventing rules in place preventing children under 13 having a profile.

On average children aged eight to 13 say they have two active social media accounts; teens aged 14-17 report having three. …

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