Schulhoff: Complete String Quartets

By Cowan, Rob | Gramophone, March 2017 | Go to article overview

Schulhoff: Complete String Quartets


Cowan, Rob, Gramophone


Schulhoff

Complete String Quartets

Alma Quartet

Gutman (F) (2) CDNR161 (110' * DDD)

This is the first comprehensive set of the music for string quartet by a composer whose notated yet completely silent anti-war statement In futurum (not part of this particular venture) anticipated John Cage's 4'33" by more than 30 years. It's an extraordinary traversal, beautiful, witty, unsettling and, as so often with Erwin Schulhoff, redolent of the Roaring Twenties, soon to roar out of control into one of the darkest periods in modern history, the composer himself being one of its tragic victims. The Alma Quartet is made up of players from the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, so one can expect, as a matter of course, a keen sense of musical interrelation.

The numbered quartets are perhaps the most accomplished works here, the First (1924) opening with a ferocious Presto confuoco reminiscent of Hindemith at his most uncompromisingly precocious, then a wryly lilting Allegretto, an Allegro giocoso that toys with Bartokian dance rhythms and employs whistling harmonics, and the mysterious finale, nearly seven minutes of melancholy or agitated musing that's not too far removed from the darker music in Prokofiev's two quartets, the Second especially. Schulhoff's own Second Quartet (1925) takes sustenance from the world of Smetana (the Piano Trio and The Bartered Bride), or seems to, whereas halfway through the Theme-and-variations second movement we're thrown into a mirror-image Twenties dance music.

The Five Pieces date from 192 3 and do the rounds of Vienna, Italy, the Czech Republic and Argentina, with music to match, the warmly seductive Alia tango milonga fourth movement being the most original. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Schulhoff: Complete String Quartets
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.