The Small District Challenge: Smaller Schools and Districts Face Some Unique Challenges When It Comes to Defending against Ransomware

T H E Journal (Technological Horizons In Education), January-February 2017 | Go to article overview

The Small District Challenge: Smaller Schools and Districts Face Some Unique Challenges When It Comes to Defending against Ransomware


When the State Educational Technology Directors Association (SEDTA) issued its latest recommendations for broadband capacity, there was a major difference in the current report as compared to the 2012 report related to how it handles estimates based on district size. One particularly interesting note is how it considers smaller school systems.

In 2012, the State Education Technology Directors Association's original set of bandwidth goals offered a lone minimum. By the 2017-2018 academic year, every school should aspire to provide Internet access speeds of 1 Gigabit per second (Gbps) for every 1000 users; whether those were students, staff or guests.

In the report just issued, "The Broadband Imperative II: Equitable Access for Learning," SETDA reexamined their recommended capacity from the perspective of school size.

While medium school districts (those with around 3,000 students) stayed the course at 1 Megabit per second (Mbps) per student for 2017-2018, smaller districts (fewer than 1,000 students) now have a target of at least 1.5 Mbps per user with a minimum of 100 Mbps for the district. Large school systems (those with more than 10,000 students) have a goal of at least 0.7 Gbps per 1,000 users.

SETDA bases its recommendations on "research, analysis of data sets from districts across eight states regarding both capacity and usage, and consultation with experts in the field." The report emphasizes, "some districts will need more than the recommendations depending upon their digital learning environments."

Study the math for a moment, though, and you'll quickly realize that smaller districts are actually being pushed to have more capacity per user than mid-sized and large districts. "Basic administrative and automation functions" consume a larger proportion of the overall network usage. That actually increases the per-user bandwidth requirement.

For example, the report states, "an extremely small school with 15 students and a 1.5 Mbps per user connection technically meets the current connectivity requirement, but they don't have enough bandwidth for more than a few intensive bandwidth activities at the same time. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

The Small District Challenge: Smaller Schools and Districts Face Some Unique Challenges When It Comes to Defending against Ransomware
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.