Country's Culture of Violence Must Shock Us Enough to Strive for Change

Cape Times (South Africa), May 17, 2017 | Go to article overview

Country's Culture of Violence Must Shock Us Enough to Strive for Change


THE recent spate of stories about violence against women and children in the media is shocking - or it should be.

But in a country where rape culture underpins our gender relations and where violence of this kind is almost a norm because we see it on a daily basis, perhaps we are not as shocked as we should be. And because we are not as shocked as we should be, perhaps we are not reacting as we should.

Firstly, to clarify what we mean by rape culture when we talk about this at the Rape Crisis Cape Town Trust. The core of the problem of violence and crime in South Africa is a culture of violence, which needs to be seen and understood in the context of our extremely violent past. A culture of violence means the majority of children and young people in our country grow up in an environment where violence is part and parcel of daily life.

Violence within families, between parents, and parents being violent towards their children; violence at school and on the street, on TV and other media; video games glorifying violence; violence as a means to deal with oneA[acute accent]s feeling of inferiority or as a means to create a feeling of belonging, for instance to a criminal gang; violence of men against girls and women as a signal of masculine identity and power; and violence that has been considered by people supporting apartheid, and people fighting against it as a legitimate means to fight for one's political purposes over decades.

In a culture of violence, violence is seen as a normal and inevitable part of daily life. This can and needs to be changed. The everyday violence of men against women, those who identify as women or who have women's bodies, often takes a sexual form. By everyday violence we mean the violence that permeates the environment to the point that it can go unnoticed.

How do we change this?

When we see extreme acts of violence reported in the media we know that this is the tip of the iceberg and that unreported rape and violence against women and children is at much higher levels that just these isolated cases. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Country's Culture of Violence Must Shock Us Enough to Strive for Change
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.