Sorry, My Mistake

Manila Bulletin, June 5, 2017 | Go to article overview

Sorry, My Mistake


By Gemma Cruz Araneta

Last week, I received an email from Mr. Mahmoud S. Aziz who was touched by my memories of Marawi in the late 60's. In that column ("Marawi, Marawi!"), I mentioned that His Highness, the Aga Khan was the guest of honor and speaker at an anniversary of the Aga Khan, Museum of Islamic Art; Mr. Aziz was kind enough to send me a copy of that memorable speech which I summarized in last Thursday's column ("The Aga Khan in Marawi"). That was where I made this terrible mistake and I am grateful that Mr. Aziz brought it to my attention immediately.

I had summarized the Aga Khan's speech and in point 7. I erroneously attributed Mr. Aziz's own observations and comments about the Wahhbi/Salafi influence in the Philippines to the Aga Khan. Mr. Aziz wrote me this message: "I respectfully bring to your attention that point 7 of your article about the Wahhbi/Salafi influence in the Philippines are actually my thoughts and comments and NOT from His Highness, the Aga Khan's speech. In my email you will note the quotation marks of his speech end just before I made my comments. I would be grateful if you can clarify this to your readers as I do not want the Aga Khan misquoted since this can have significant ramifications for him." That would indeed be terrible, Mr. Aziz, forgive me for not being more careful.

Under separate cover, Mr. Aziz sent me an interesting article, "How Hundreds of Saudi Joined ISIS in the US (For immediate release. Contact Ali AlAhmed) dated 1 June 2017, from Washington, DC.

The press release said that the Institute for Gulf Affairs " is issuing an exclusive investigative report on one of the biggest terrorist threats against the United States homeland." Titled "From American College Campuses to ISIS Camps, How Hundreds of Saudis Joined ISIS in the US." The report describes how in the past three years hundreds of Saudi nationals living in the USA have joined the ISIS and similar groups. Approximately 400 Saudi and Kuwati nationals mostly on government scholarships have joined the ISIS and other groups;some of the recruits have dual citizenships. …

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