Juilliard School Library

By Gottlieb, Jane | Notes, June 2017 | Go to article overview

Juilliard School Library


Gottlieb, Jane, Notes


The Juilliard School Library has received Professor Philip Gossett's entire music collection. Comprising some 2,000 scores, books, librettos, and related materials, the collection represents Professor Gossett's lifetime study of nineteenth-century Italian opera.

Until his retirement in 2010, Gossett was the the Robert W. Reneker Distinguished Service Professor in the Department of Music at the University of Chicago, where he taught music history since 1968. His first musical training was at Juilliard, in what was then called the "Preparatory Division," where he studied piano. He later returned to Juilliard to present three doctoral forums (2004, 2007. 2009), on subjects such as "What Makes an Edition 'Critical' and Why Performers Should Care: Reflections on Rossini and Verdi," "From II viaggio a Reims to Le comte Ory: Rossini Invents Petite Opera (in conjunction with the school's production of Le comte Ory, for which he was artistic advisor), and

"Falstaff and the Musical Fragment."

Gossett was general editor of the critical editions of The Works of Giuseppe Verdi (published by the University of Chicago Press and G. Ricordi-Universal Music, Milan); and, with Alberto Rizzuti and Stefano Castelvecchi, the Works of Gioachino Rossini (published by Barenreiter Verlag, Kassel). His path-breaking book, Divas and Scholars: Performing Italian Opera (University of Chicago Press, 2006), was recognized by AMS with its Otto Kinkeldey Award for outstanding book of the year.

Juilliard will catalog and digitize the collection, and allow scholars and performers worldwide to study the treasures amassed by Gossett throughout his career. The school is truly honored to receive this donation.

Jane Gottlieb

The Juilliard School

As members of MLA and readers of Notes, we are dedicated to preserving musical legacies, and as you can see, this issue embraces that theme in several different ways. Elina Hamilton's focus is on the letters held at the Library of Congress by the founder of l'Oiseau-Lyre, Louise Hanson-Dyer. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Juilliard School Library
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.