Districts of Varying Sizes and Demographics Broaden Students' Global Education: Administrators Share How They Use the Rosetta Stone Program to Heighten Students' Critical Thinking and Communication Skills through World Language Instruction

District Administration, March 2017 | Go to article overview

Districts of Varying Sizes and Demographics Broaden Students' Global Education: Administrators Share How They Use the Rosetta Stone Program to Heighten Students' Critical Thinking and Communication Skills through World Language Instruction


World language skills help students, educators and administrators alike thrive. The Rosetta Stone[R] program provides realistic conversation instruction and activities that help develop advanced oral production and promote literacy and thought process. Administrators from districts around the country use the program to further student achievement and to build the skills needed for the global world.

Boone County Schools, Florence, Kentucky, 20,400 students BCS is offering digital language learning to 10,500 students--half of its student population.

Following the district's successful pilot in 2013 for 1,700 students at two elementary schools, the program expanded to 14 elementary schools and five middle schools in the 2016-17 academic year.

"The Rosetta Stone language learning program affords a strong supplement to our teachers' blended learning curriculum in the classroom, while also providing an excellent resource for our classrooms that do not have teachers with experience in a particular language. It's a win-win situation for our students," says Linda Black, director of elementary education.

Clarksville-Montgomery County School System,

Clarksvilte, Tennessee, 32,500 students As CMCSS serves military families stationed at nearby Fort Campbell, many students have brought world language experience gained while overseas to the classroom, contributing to the more than 40 languages now being spoken in the district and the need for a comprehensive single solution to meet CMCSS'diverse language learning needs.

"Rosetta Stone permitted us the opportunity to meet the foreign language needs of a highly mobile and diverse population of students in an interface that the students found quickly engaging," says Kimi Sucharski, district data analyst for the accountability instruction and curriculum department. …

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