Labour Has Been Undone by Two Referendums-Now the Tories Are Surging in Scotland and Wales

By Eaton, George | New Statesman (1996), April 28, 2017 | Go to article overview

Labour Has Been Undone by Two Referendums-Now the Tories Are Surging in Scotland and Wales


Eaton, George, New Statesman (1996)


In the final week of the Scottish independence referendum campaign, as the Union appeared in peril, David Cameron pleaded with voters to punish his party rather than Scotland. "If you are fed up with the effing Tories, give them a kick," he said. Cameron's language reflected a settled view; the Conservatives were irredeemably loathed by Scots. For nearly two decades, the party had no more than one MP north of the border. Changing the party's name for devolved contests was discussed.

Since becoming Conservative leader, Theresa May has pursued a hard--she prefers "clean"--Brexit strategy that Scots voted against and the Conservatives have achieved a UK-wide poll lead of 20 points.

Yet rather than regressing, the Scottish Conservatives have resurged. On 22 April, a Panelbase poll put them on 33 per cent in Scotland (a rise of 18 points since 2015). A favoured Labour barb used to be that there were more pandas (two) in Scotland than Tory MPs (one). The poll would leave the Tories with 12 seats and Corbyn's party with none. Tory aides confess that they were surprised by the figures but declare there are "no limits to our ambitions" in Scotland.

The roots of this recovery lie in the 2014 independence referendum. The vote, and the SNP's subsequent landslide victory in the 2015 general election, realigned Scottish politics along unionist and nationalist lines. Led by Ruth Davidson, the Scottish Conservatives have ably exploited the opportunity. "We said No. We meant it," the party's official slogan declares of Nicola Sturgeon's demand for a second referendum. Under Ruth Davidson, the Tories have already become the official opposition at Holyrood.

Labour is torn between retaining unionists and winning back nationalists. It has been punished for its equivocation, as it is being punished over its confused response to Brexit. In April 2016, the Scottish Labour leader, Kezia Dugdale, said that it was "not inconceivable" that she could back independence if the UK voted to leave the EU (and earlier suggested that MPs and MSPs could be given a free vote). Jeremy Corbyn recently stated that he was "absolutely fine" with a second referendum being held.

"For us it's a badge of honour but there are some people in Scottish Labour who are quite queasy about that word [unionist] and I think Jeremy Corbyn would be very queasy about it," Adam Tomkins, a Conservative MSP for Glasgow and public law professor, told me. "Don't forget the Northern Ireland dimension; we've all seen the photos of him rubbing shoulders with leading republicans. The Scottish Union is very different to the Irish Union but the word migrates."

The irony is that Corbyn allies believed his anti-austerity, anti-Trident platform would allow Labour to recover in Scotland. Yet the pre-eminence of the national question has left it in a political no-man's land.

In contrast to the rest of the UK, Scots backed Remain by 62 per cent to 38 per cent. …

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