The Value of Political Cartoons: Why Newspapers Need to Invest in This Form of Reader Engagement

By Tornoe, Rob | Editor & Publisher, June 2017 | Go to article overview

The Value of Political Cartoons: Why Newspapers Need to Invest in This Form of Reader Engagement


Tornoe, Rob, Editor & Publisher


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After an era marked by downsizing and low morale, many newspapers are experiencing a rebirth of their journalistic vigor thanks to the campaign and subsequent election of Donald Trump as president.

While the mission of watchdog journalism has been renewed by the Trump administration's war with the press, there has been a notable absence of an important form of political satire long associated with newspapers that doesn't appear to have benefited from a Trump bump.

Political cartoons, once a staple of newspapers that were as popular with readers as they were hated by those in power, have all but disappeared from the online offerings of many media companies ensconced in the brutal transition from a print-centric world to a digital-first mission.

Those media companies that do have editorial cartoonists remaining on staff, less than 30 by my count, largely relegate their work to less-trafficked internal pages of their websites, seemingly for no reason other than a lack of any idea how to properly utilize them.

That's something Chris Weyant is trying to better understand. A cartoonist by trade, Weyant's work stretches across the publishing world in many forms. He draws gag cartoons for the New Yorker, produces award-winning children's books with his wife, Anna Kang, and is an accomplished political cartoonist who spent 15 years skewering Washington's elite in the pages of The Hill.

Weyant is a year removed from participating as a Nieman Fellow, just the second cartoonist accepted into the prestigious journalism program in its nearly 80 years of existence. He left his wife and two kids in New Jersey and spent a frill year at Harvard, taking classes, speaking with fellow journalists and editors and trying to tackle a question in the forefront of his mind: Why aren't political cartoons more popular online?

"It just didn't seem to make sense," Weyant said of the lack of interest in digital political cartoons at newspapers with a history of cartooning. "The internet is a visual medium, so it seems obvious cartoons could be an important asset to journalism's evolving digital business model."

Not surprisingly, Weyant didn't find much scholarly focus on political cartoons. In a way, it mirrors a major problem cartoons face getting traction at many publications -most editors are writers, and have a hard time understanding the importance of visual journalism, or how to best utilize it.

It's actually a problem Weyant experienced first-hand while at The Hill, where his cartoons were barely an afterthought on the newspaper's website. Quickly, Weyant devised a new strategy that involved a cropped version of his cartoon appearing on the website's homepage, and quickly traffic to his work rivaled the top offerings presented on a daily basis.

It's a trend he also discovered at other publications, like the New Yorker, which feature cartoons on their homepage. According to traffic numbers Weyant has been studying, readers that enter a publication's website through a topical cartoon tend to spend 25 percent more time browsing the site than they do entering through any other type of content.

"They stay so much longer and go so much deeper when they click a cartoon versus any other type of content," Weyant said. "That's an amazing metric of real reader engagement."

Weyant thinks this makes the case that cartoons should be featured more prominently on the homepages of news organizations and in their social media offerings, where a funny and engaging cartoon can act as a soft landing spot in an otherwise off-putting news cycle. …

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