Hottest Books for the Beach; Whether You Want to Relax with Some Crime Fiction or Tackle That Heavyweight History You've Been Meaning to Read All Year, Our Reviewers Recommend Their Favourite Titles to Take on Holiday

The Evening Standard (London, England), July 6, 2017 | Go to article overview

Hottest Books for the Beach; Whether You Want to Relax with Some Crime Fiction or Tackle That Heavyweight History You've Been Meaning to Read All Year, Our Reviewers Recommend Their Favourite Titles to Take on Holiday


Michael Burleigh Mick Herron's Real Tigers (Murray, PS14.99) combines the spy thriller with farce in a manner befitting a country that puts Coco the Clown in charge of the Secret Intelligence Service. Another compelling satire is Stephen Glover's Splash (Constable, PS18.99). This is an updated Scoop for our age involving a mid-market tabloid with a sinister online operation in its bowels. The characters, Glover assures us, are entirely composite. Like hell!

Howard W French's Everything under the Heavens: How the Past Helps China's Push for Global Power (Scribe, PS20) brilliantly fuses history and reportage to explore China's relationships with its neighbours, including Japan, the Philippines and Vietnam, as well as the floating one represented by the US Pacific fleet.

Claire Harman For an engrossing under-the-trees read this summer you couldn't do much better than Francis Spufford's fabulous Golden Hill (Faber, PS8.99) a rollicking good yarn set in Manhattan in the 1740s, which wears its learning so lightly you hardly notice how much historical detail the author manages to pack in while delivering his thrilling set-pieces and plot twists right up to the last page.

At a different tempo, but just as skillful, is Tessa Hadley's Bad Dreams and Other Stories (Cape, PS16.99), a collection showing all her trademark qualities of pin-sharp observation and arresting expression. And if you aren't enjoying Club 18-30, why not find a quiet corner in which to read Olivia Laing's The Lonely City: Adventures in the Art of Being Alone (Canongate, PS9.99), which is brilliantly written and poignantly affecting.

Robert Fox A brilliant, though not exactly relaxing, summer read is Johnny Mercer's We Were Warriors (Sidgwick&Jackson, PS18.99), not only the best hand-to-hand combat account of a British soldier in Afghanistan, but a journey of the soul, from fighting soldier to MP for Plymouth the self-deprecating journal of a remarkable man.

Europe After Europe by Ivan Krastev (Pennsylvania University PS7.70/PS14.71) is an unlikely hit the best essay today on history and the world of Trump, Brexit, migrants and climate change. For pure selfindulgence the Italians do the best noir around. Maurizio de Giovanni's Commissario Ricciardi is top of the tree fighting fascism and the Camorra in 1920s Naples.

Jane Shilling The best summer reading combines a lightness of attack with a certain heft of intent. Ulrich Raulff 's Farewell to the Horse (Allen Lane, PS25) achieves the combination with verve. Exploring the separation of human and equine destinies, which took place from Napoleonic times to the First World War, Raulff's tender and witty history celebrates the role in human affairs of the most political of animals, and the most symbolic.

Birdcage Walk (Hutchinson, PS18.99), the final novel by the late Helen Dunmore, left, is a chilling drama enclosing a graceful and elegiac meditation on how to live well in turbulent political times, on the consequences of choice, the power of language, and the faint trace that individual lives leave on history.

Arifa Akbar Han Yujoo's novel, The Impossible Fairy Tale (Tilted Axis Press, PS8.99), about creepy goings-on in a Korean classroom that lead to a murderous act, has a sensational child voice innocent and monstrous by turns that makes it an edge-of-the-recliner read. Another excellent ghost story is Hari Kunzru's White Tears (Hamish Hamilton. PS14.99), about two blues 'n' jazz hipsters who devise a prank that misfires and unspools a mesmerising tale of white guilt and black oppression in America.

Sally Rooney's Conversations with Friends (Faber, PS14.99), has a beguiling lightness that takes us to unexpectedly melancholy places; its brilliance lies in observations of human frailty in matters of the heart.

Andrew Roberts Giles Udy's Labour and the Gulag: Russia and the Seduction of the British Left (Biteback, PS30) is about the Marxist infiltration of the Labour party in the 1920s and 1930s, which seems apposite reading today. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Hottest Books for the Beach; Whether You Want to Relax with Some Crime Fiction or Tackle That Heavyweight History You've Been Meaning to Read All Year, Our Reviewers Recommend Their Favourite Titles to Take on Holiday
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.