The UN Founding and Founders: Most People Believe That the United Nations Was Started with the High Ideal of Preventing War, but It Was Started as a Seed That Could Be Grown into World Government

By Jasper, William F. | The New American, June 5, 2017 | Go to article overview

The UN Founding and Founders: Most People Believe That the United Nations Was Started with the High Ideal of Preventing War, but It Was Started as a Seed That Could Be Grown into World Government


Jasper, William F., The New American


On April 25, 1945, an extraordinary gathering of politicians and diplomats from 46 nations convened in San Francisco. Over the next two months, they completed the formal negotiations for a project that had been under way (both secretly and publicly) for several years. Their project, ostensibly, envisioned a world organization that would put an end to war. The Second World War was all but over. The German army was in retreat everywhere, and on April 27, Berlin was completely encircled. Italian dictator Benito Mussolini was captured on April 28 and summarily shot and hanged in Milan. Adolf Hitler and his longtime mistress, Eva Braun, committed suicide on April 30. On May 8, Germany unconditionally surrendered and Victory in Europe, V-E Day, was declared.

Fierce fighting continued to rage in the Pacific as the "peace conference" got under way in San Francisco, but Japan was also in retreat. Victory over Japan (V-J Day) was declared on August 14, following the dropping of atomic bombs on Hiroshima (August 6) and Nagasaki (August 9).

The war's devastation had left much of Europe in ruins. Millions of soldiers, sailors, airmen, and civilians had been killed. Millions more were sick and wounded. There were millions of homeless refugees. Across Asia, the carnage of war had likewise cut an incredible swath of human desolation and economic destruction.

Amid the jubilant celebrations of V-E Day/V-J Day and the somber reflections on colossal war-born misery, thinking people of humane conscience everywhere were asking questions and looking for answers. How did this happen? Why all the needless death and destruction? If another war were to break out--one utilizing the terrifying new power of atomic weapons --could humanity even survive? Is there no way to put an end to war? Could something like the failed League of Nations, or some other proposal for "collective security," have prevented World War II? Must we not strive mightily, think differently, and take extraordinary measures to avert any possibility of a World War III?

For hope and answers, the attention of our troubled world was directed toward the "noble undertaking" on America's west coast. A front-page story on the San Francisco conference in the New York Times for April 24 carried the headline "46 Nations Ready to Organize Peace."

The subhead for the story, referring to U.S. Secretary of State Edward R. Stettinius, read: "Stettinius, Arriving for Opening Today, Sets Keynote for Forming World Agency."

"Now the deepest hope and highest purpose of all mankind--enduring peace --is here committed to our hands," Secretary Stettinius told the august assemblage. "With that image of the aspiration of mankind before us, with the conviction that the work we have to do is good and that our purpose can be brought to pass, let us unite with confidence and hope in our common labor."

The conference that Secretary Stettinius addressed was, of course, the Charter Conference of the United Nations, regarded as the founding gathering of the world body. For two months--April 25-June 26--representatives of 50 nations, four of which were invited after the conference began, debated and negotiated relatively inconsequential details of two foundational documents that had already been written and presented to them: the United Nations Charter and the Statute of the International Court of Justice. (There were to have been 51 nations at the conference, but the Polish contingent was unable to attend because the Soviet Union and its communist puppets in Poland were making a freely elected, democratic government--which Stalin agreed to at the Yalta Conference --impossible.)

In the seven decades since that United Nations Charter Conference, countless editorials, textbooks, and speeches have reverentially extolled the virtuous "aspirations," "vision," and "ideals" of the UN founders. Even many conservatives who detest the UN because they recognize it to be a corrupt and murderous dictators club nevertheless feel compelled to genuflect in homage to the men whose "noble ideals" supposedly guided the framing of the world body. …

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