A Walk through American History in Its Capital City Washington Is. EASY DC; A Walk through American History in Its Capital City Washington Is.PART 1: WASHINGTON DC BY JIM MURTY AMERICA'S CAPITALS; History Should the Lan Free It' Y as It Be. in ND of the 'S All Free

Daily Mail (London), July 15, 2017 | Go to article overview

A Walk through American History in Its Capital City Washington Is. EASY DC; A Walk through American History in Its Capital City Washington Is.PART 1: WASHINGTON DC BY JIM MURTY AMERICA'S CAPITALS; History Should the Lan Free It' Y as It Be. in ND of the 'S All Free


ONY got tired of running.

TThese days he props up the end counter of the diner, grateful for the hot breakfast and smile, the break from the street and the Christian shelter. Tony used to run on the same American college circuit as our own Eamonn Coghlan in the Seventies but while Eamonn went on to become a world 5000m champion Tony didn't stay the course.

Tony walks me through his story over a half-smoke at Ben's Chili Bowl in Washington DC, the same Ben's that Barack Obama visited a week before his inauguration.

He too had a half-smoke (half-beef, halfpork hot dog with chili sauce in a bun). Bono's been here too, in fact he took up residence in a way: his picture is above our heads in a gallery of famous visitors. Outside, murals of inspirational figures from the civil rights movement cover the wall. Ben's is the heartbeat of U Street, or Black Broadway, as it was known, the one business allowed to stay open through the curfew in the days of rioting following the assassination of Martin Luther King in the Sixties. Tony licks his lips and asks if I want anything on the jukebox, I choose Aretha Franklin. I Say A Little Prayer.

U Street which is draped in rainbow flags in advance of Gay Pride Week is a couple of kilometres' walk from Pennsylvania Avenue and near my hotels for this week, the comfortable boutique-style Kimpton Carlyle on New Hampshire Avenue, and the sweeping Washington Hilton on Connecticut Avenue where Ronald Reagan was shot.

Both are close to R, T and U Street. Washington must have been designed for postmen: it's all letters.

The nation's capital was Pierre L'Enfant's piece de resistance, a new capital for the new Republic. It runs roughly on three themes, parallel lettering and numbered streets and intersecting State names. Just stick to the alphabet and you'll soon be walking through an A-Z of American history, except that there is no Z (nobody knows why).

I head first for the Archives Museum on C Street and Pennsylvania Avenue, or 'Pensylvania' as it's misspelt on the Dec-TURN TO NEXT PAGE, TRAVEL TURN TO NEXT PAGE, TRAVEL laration of Independence scroll which you can see along with the Constitution in the museum's rotunda. This is how history should be viewed. What's more in the Land of the Free, it and the other 16 Smithsonian Institute Museums are all free.

To pick the best is like being asked to select your favourite child. There is the extensive media Newseum, a collection of the first draft of history including iconic photographs and headlines that should never have gone to press - my favourite is Farmer Bill Dies In House; poignantly for the Irish visitor, the artefacts also include Veronica Guerin's pen; the Air Museum takes you from the early days of flight with the Wright Brothers, Amelia Earhart and Charles Lindbergh right through to the Space Age and there are of course many, many grand art galleries.

The hottest ticket in town according to Washingtonians and one that needs to be booked ahead is the African-American Museum which should be taken along with a trip to Dr King's statue on Independence Avenue and the immaculately preserved house of Civil War Emancipation campaigner Frederick Douglass with the best view of Washington.

They all deserve your time but the one I found myself returning to time and again was the American-Indian Museum.

Washington DC may well be a celebration of US history but that history has not always been a proud one, as Bill Clinton felt forced to concede when he addressed the Native Nations as President. He was right though to say that the future can be.

For now we must make do with the legacy of the likes of Pocohontas, one of only three historical figures to be referenced three times, in the rotunda of the Capitol (the other two are George Washington and Christopher Columbus). The rotunda's frieze is a time saver if you're on a schedule.

time saver if you're on a schedule. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

A Walk through American History in Its Capital City Washington Is. EASY DC; A Walk through American History in Its Capital City Washington Is.PART 1: WASHINGTON DC BY JIM MURTY AMERICA'S CAPITALS; History Should the Lan Free It' Y as It Be. in ND of the 'S All Free
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.