Young Naperville Singers Expands Choral Avenues for Children, Teens

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), July 21, 2017 | Go to article overview

Young Naperville Singers Expands Choral Avenues for Children, Teens


Byline: Young Naperville Singers submission

As Young Naperville Singers celebrates 33 years of soaring in song, the choir continues its dedication to promoting the highest level of artistic excellence in choral music through extraordinary educational and performance experiences that enrich the lives of young people.

Founded in 1984 by the late Helen Grubbs, Young Naperville Singers has grown to become a premier community-based children's choral music education program in Chicago's West suburbs and the Fox River Valley.

Grubbs' vision of a choir that would remove the constraints of school boundaries, religious affiliations, cultural or racial barriers, and socioeconomic status continues to grow and thrive under the leadership of Artistic Director Angie Johnson. Three decades later, more than 370 singers participate in YNS.

Located primarily in downtown Naperville, with one choir meeting in Oswego, Young Naperville Singers consists of nine ability-based choirs. Members range in age from 6 to 18.

This fall, Young Naperville Singers will launch the boys training choir, Brio, to help younger inexperienced boys learn the basics of vocal technique and music literacy.

Directors from the chorus have found that even the youngest boys are more comfortable singing in an all-boy choir.

Brio joins Ragazzi, the NYS chorus begun in 2011 for boys in grades four to nine that is currently the only boys choir in the West suburbs.

Continuing its tradition of serving young men, in 2013 the choir introduced the young men's chorus,

Canto Vivo, composed of older boys whose voices are changing or have changed.

Participation from boys has significantly increased, and YNS is dedicated to fostering that growth by offering as many opportunities as possible. The three male-only choirs help fill that need.

Through singing, young people become leaders and collaborators, and experience community.

The chorus' vision has enabled the choristers to experience a variety of musical opportunities such as performing with the American Boychoir, participating in the Des Moines International Children's Choir Festival, collaborating with professional guest artists such as Judy Collins and Natalie MacMaster and premiering commissioned works by Mary Goetze, Lee R. Kesselman, Malcolm Dalglish, James Mulholland, Betty Bertaux, Rollo Dilworth, David Brunner, Daniel Brubaker, Stephen Paulus and Bob Chilcott, renowned composers of children's choral literature. …

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