Literary Fiction

Daily Mail (London), July 28, 2017 | Go to article overview

Literary Fiction


Byline: JOHN HARDING

ANNA by Niccolo Ammaniti (Canongate PS12.99) TEEN Anna and her younger brother Astor live in a world without adults. A strange plague has swept the world, infecting everyone and becoming fatally active when teenagers reach puberty.

Mostly, the two children stay behind the fence around their Sicilian home, which is piled high with rubbish, and where their mother's skeleton rests on her bed.

But every day, Anna must venture into the outside world, where gangs of feral children roam in search of food and medicine. And all the time, the clock is ticking towards her own demise as her body matures.

The siblings' only chance seems to be to reach the mainland, in the hope that some grown-ups may have survived the illness and have a cure for it.

Niccolo Ammaniti's Italian bestseller has been compared to those classic novels featuring children in a dystopia, Lord Of The Flies and The Road.

Although the characterisation is certainly not in that class, it's a powerfully disturbing and thought-provoking read.

MIDWINTER BREAK by Bernard MacLaverty (Cape PS14.99) RETIRED Irish couple Gerry and Stella fly from their Glasgow home to Amsterdam for a midwinter break.

But their view on this sightseeing trip soon turns inwards, as they contemplate their marriage and the uncertain future.

Gerry is a stupendously heavy drinker and self-deluded enough to believe that Stella is unaware of his secret forays to buy whisky, conceal it in their hotel room and slug it in the bathroom.

Stella, too, is hiding something that she is tired of Gerry's drinking and his mocking of her religion and is considering abandoning him for a Dutch Catholic community. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Literary Fiction
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.