Relationship of Anger with Alcohol Use Treatment Outcome: Follow-Up Study

By Sharma, Manoj; Suman, L. et al. | Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine, July-August 2017 | Go to article overview

Relationship of Anger with Alcohol Use Treatment Outcome: Follow-Up Study


Sharma, Manoj, Suman, L., Murthy, Pratima, Marimuthu, P., Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine


Byline: Manoj. Sharma, L. Suman, Pratima. Murthy, P. Marimuthu

Background: Anger is seen as comorbid condition in psychiatric conditions. It has an impact on one's quality of life. It leads to variation in the treatment outcome. The present study is going to explore the relationship of anger with treatment outcome among alcohol users after 1 year of treatment. The data for the present study were taken from the project work on correlates of anger among alcohol users, funded by center for addiction medicine, NIMHANS, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 males (50 alcohol-dependent and 50 abstainers) in the age range of 20–45 years with a primary diagnosis of alcohol dependence were taken for the study. They were administered a semi-structured interview schedule to obtain information about sociodemographic details, information about alcohol use, its relationship with anger and its effects on anger control and the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory. Results: 68% of the dependent and abstainers perceived anger as negative emotion and 76% in control perceived it as negative. The presence of significant difference was seen for relapsers group in relation to trait anger and state anger. The group who remained abstinent from the intake to follow-up differs significantly from the dependent group in relation to state anger and anger control out. Mean score was higher on trait anger for the dependent group. Conclusions: It has implication for anger management intervention/matching of treatment with users attributes and helping the users to develop the behavioral repertoires to manage anger.

Introduction

Anger is seen as a negative phenomenological experience that exists on a continuum (a continuum of healthy-disturbed, adaptive-maladaptive, constructive-destructive, and pragmatic-problematic) in which the frequency, the intensity and the duration of the experience, along with the expressive (i.e., subjective, physiological, interpretive, and behavioral) characteristics, often leads to significant psychosocial impairment.[sup][1] It is a potential mediator in many psychiatric conditions, including affective disorders, substance use disorders, and posttraumatic stress disorder.[sup][1],[2],[3] Negative affect such as depression, anger, hostility, and aggression were seen as risk factors among pregnant persistent smokers.[sup][4] Difficulty in controlling anger in interpersonal relations may be seen especially among individuals suffering from alcohol and substance dependence, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, and generalized anxiety disorder. Alcohol use facilitates episodes of physical aggression. The use of alcohol and cocaine was associated with significant increases in the daily likelihood of male-to-female physical aggression.[sup][5] The form of anger expression was significantly related to the likelihood and the intensity of anger as well as the type of the consequences associated with the emotional state.[sup][6] Trait anger was also associated with decreased quality of life and anger expression, whereas state anger was related with better quality of life and anger control among 50 alcohol dependent (as per International Classification of Diseases-10 criteria), 50 abstainers (diagnosed of alcohol dependence but currently maintaining abstinence from alcohol for the last 3 months), and 50 social drinker (no lifetime use of >2 standard drinks per day). Alcohol dependent group had high mean scores for state anger, trait anger, and expression/experience of anger. They had lower anger control. The dependent group had low mean scores in physical health, psychological health, and social relationship beside environment domains. The quality of life has a correlation with anger control (in/out), trait anger, temperament, and reaction in the control and abstainers group, whereas the quality of life has negative correlation with trait anger expression among the alcohol group. …

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