Preventing Traumatic Brain Injuries: Kids, Seniors Most at Risk for Harm

By Late, Michele | The Nation's Health, July 2017 | Go to article overview

Preventing Traumatic Brain Injuries: Kids, Seniors Most at Risk for Harm


Late, Michele, The Nation's Health


FOR MANY PEOPLE, a bump to the head may seem like a minor occurrence. But the fact is traumatic brain injuries caused by bumps, blows, jolts and other trauma to the head are a major cause of death and disability in the United States.

About 2.8 million emergency department visits, hospitalizations and deaths related to traumatic brain injuries occurred in the U.S. in 2013 alone, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And such instances are on the increase, a March CDC study found.

"Traumatic brain injuries are a serious public health problem in the United States," said CDC in a Brain Injury Awareness Month feature in March. "Those who survive a TBI can face effects lasting a few days to disabilities which may last the rest of their lives."

Falls are the leading cause of traumatic brain injuries, accounting for almost half of all related emergency department visits, hospitalizations and deaths. Other common causes are being struck by or against an object, assaults and motor vehicle crashes. Seniors and young children are at highest risk for traumatic brain injuries.

Fortunately, many traumatic brain injuries can be prevented. To reduce the risk of traumatic brain injuries in children, CDC recommends installing protective guards on windows, placing safety gates near stairs and using shock-absorbing surfaces on playgrounds. Children should also use helmets while riding a bike or scooter, skating, skiing, playing contact sports and during other high-risk activities. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Preventing Traumatic Brain Injuries: Kids, Seniors Most at Risk for Harm
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.