Small Kitchens Rely on Innovative Storage

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), August 13, 2017 | Go to article overview

Small Kitchens Rely on Innovative Storage


A small kitchen needs to perform just like a tiny galley on a boat. Every square inch must be designed for maximum function, easy utility and durability.

Hinges, drawer pulls, cabinet knobs and specialty hardware with flipper doors (to eliminate clumsy swinging cabinet doors) are either made of wood or solid brass. Every moving part must operate fluidly and be in good working order so that everything can be stowed away at a moment's notice, like with a change in the weather.

When nautical designers plan a kitchen, they know work centers must serve a dual purpose and must be secured and covered when not in use so nothing falls or spills over. Surfaces can hold cushions or bedding that are tied down for passage. Finishes are selected that are durable enough to fight back against corrosive salty air and water. On land, small kitchens are constantly used and demand the most durable materials. Fortunately, when we consider finish choices, the lesser amount required for a small space allows you to select some of the top-quality materials.

In a studio apartment, the kitchen sink is sometimes covered with a sturdy cutting board when entertaining in order to augment the counter space. Gaining 24 inches of space for bowls and pans makes it possible to arrange a buffet. Generally, a slim refrigerator is used. For generations, the typical Manhattan apartment has come with a tiny 24-inch-wide refrigerator or an under-the-counter refrigerator. Fortunately, modern European appliance manufacturers, such as Liebherr, and American small appliance makers, including Avanti, supply a range of petite refrigerators.

European styles are made to have a very slim door panel and minimum structure so that more of the width is devoted to the chilling cavity instead of the door. …

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