10 Magical TV Moments; Celebrating the Glittering 50-Year Career of the One and Only Sir David Jason - a True Master of Comedy and Acting

Liverpool Echo (Liverpool, England), August 26, 2017 | Go to article overview

10 Magical TV Moments; Celebrating the Glittering 50-Year Career of the One and Only Sir David Jason - a True Master of Comedy and Acting


BY SARA WALLIS, TV Columnist FROM his iconic role as wheeler-dealer Del Boy Trotter to his award-winning performance as a detective in A Touch Of Frost, Sir David Jason is one of the greatest actors of his generation.

Sir David, 77, has been entertaining us for over 50 years since his first part in Crossroads in 1964.

Even the Queen is a big fan - knighting him in 2005 for his services to acting and comedy. Here we highlight our top 10 favourite moments of his career...

and Robin Only Fools) Boy and Rodney (Nicholas pulled out all the stops a fancy dress bash in Heroes And Villains, one of the best loved Only Fools episodes of all time.

The hapless pair even managed to prevent a mugging en route to the party - the thieves assuming they were under attack from the Caped Crusader and Boy Wonder. Holy gullibility, Batman!

Falling through the bar hatch (Only Fools) Possibly the greatest pratfall of all time was when Del Boy - dressed to impress the ladies and telling Trigger to play it cool - fell through the bar hatch in Only Fools And Horses.

Danger Mouse Sir David became the world's greatest secret agent when he voiced rodent spy Danger Mouse. The original 1981 series was such a hit that at its peak 21 million viewers tuned in. As DM would say: "Good grief."

A Touch of Frost Detective Inspector Jack Frost was played by Sir David for 18 years. When it finally ended, he revealed how he shed a few tears as he filmed his last scenes. The emotional last episode was seen by around 10 million viewers in 2010.

Open All Hours In his role of Granville, Sir David was mercilessly bullied by his uncle Arkwright - played by the late, great Ronnie Barker. …

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