Books as Hot as Our Future If We Don't Address Global Warming Now: Summer Reads for Taking Action on Climate Change

By Krisberg, Kim | The Nation's Health, August 2017 | Go to article overview

Books as Hot as Our Future If We Don't Address Global Warming Now: Summer Reads for Taking Action on Climate Change


Krisberg, Kim, The Nation's Health


AUGUST is DEEP in the dog days of summer, which makes it a perfect time to slow down and squeeze in some summer reading. This year's reading list takes on one of the hottest and most challenging threats facing public health today: climate change. In recognition of growing concerns, and the efforts public health is making to fight back, APHA has designated 2017 as the Year of Climate Change and Health, making this the perfect time to read up on the topic.

Climate of Hope: How Cities, Businesses and Citizens Can Save the Planet

Michael Bloomberg, MBA, and Carl Pope

Bloomberg, the former mayor of New York City, and Pope, former head of the Sierra Club, offer a manifesto on the benefits of taking action to address climate change, exploring a variety of solutions to effect positive change and move critical climate efforts forward. The authors agree that even in the absence of national action, states, communities and individuals can help.

2017, St. Martin's Press, 272 pages

An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power Al Gore

The former vice president and one of the worlds most outspoken climate advocates presents the follow-up to the 2006 documentary film "An Inconvenient Truth," bringing readers stories of climate action from around the world. Importantly, the book doesn't hold back from exposing the reality of humankind's contributions to global warming, offering readers concrete steps to help reverse the damage we've done.

2017, Rodale Books, 320 pages

New York 2140

Kim Stanley Robinson

If you haven't heard of the "cli-fi" genre, perhaps this book can be your introduction. Short for climate fiction, the emerging genre paints an often-troubling and apocalyptic picture of our environmental future, though the upside is that its authors may be reaching readers in a way that scientists and advocates can't. In Robinson's futuristic book, New York City is under water, but one community is still thriving and peppered with a diverse cast of characters. After the disappearance of a group of coders sets off a chain of events, everyone is at risk.

2017, Orbit, 624 pages

Zika: The Emerging Epidemic

Donald McNeil Jr.

Scientists predict changing weather patterns will exacerbate the risk of vector-borne disease and make it easier for disease-carrying vectors to move into new territories. Such is the case with Zika virus, the subject of McNeil's recent book, which chronicles the origins of Zika, its recent spread, the race for a cure and how we can protect our communities from the disease. McNeil, a New York Times science reporter, also explores the history of the virus. He charts how it was once considered a mild disease, until a 2015 outbreak in Brazil was linked to serious, life-threatening birth defects.

2016, W.W. Norton & Company, 208 pages

Where the Water Goes: Life and Death Along the Colorado River

David Owen

Scientists say climate change is already impacting the flow of the Colorado River, which is the focal point of Owen's adventurous story of the waterway. Following the river's flow from it headwaters to its endpoint, Owen, a staff writer at The New Yorker, chronicles the competing and cooperative factors that both endanger the waterway and sustain it. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Books as Hot as Our Future If We Don't Address Global Warming Now: Summer Reads for Taking Action on Climate Change
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.