Wray

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), August 31, 2017 | Go to article overview

Wray


Dr. Susan Wray Dr. Susan Wray, 59, of Montclair NJ, formerly of St. Charles, IL and Santa Monica, CA, passed away peacefully on August 10, 2017 from cancer. Her mother and two sisters were by her side. Susan Wray was a graduate of St. Charles High School in 1976. She went to Northern Arizona University where she earned her BS in Elementary Education. After graduation, she became a kindergarten teacher in Phoenix, AZ. She moved to Santa Monica, California where she worked for Future Kids, specializing in computer literacy for children. She sang in the South Bay Master Choral as well as The Consortium Choral in New Jersey who toured and performed in The Canterbury Cathedral in Canterbury, England. Wanting to further her education, she enrolled at University of Wisconsin-Madison. She earned her MS and PHD in Early Childhood, Elementary Education. She joined the faculty at Montclair State University in 2003 as a tenure track faculty member in the Department of Early Childhood, Elementary and Literacy Education. In 2009, MSU received the first of two 6.5 million dollar federal grants from the Department of Education. They were awarded to MSU College of Education and Human Services to prepare teachers for Newark Public Schools. Dr. Wray was lead faculty on both grants as well as co-principal investigator on the second. Dr. Wray wrote about the Urban Teacher Residency Program and gave presentations at national conferences. "Dr. Susan Wray was the quintessential teacher educator. She was knowledgeable, dedicated to her students and social justice, generous to her colleagues and kind and respectful to all. She leaves behind hundreds of teachers she prepared well to meet the needs of their students. All of us-colleagues on campus and in the schools and former students- mourn her passing and will miss her terribly. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Wray
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.