Diana's Greatest Legacy: The Destruction of Our Monarchy

The Mail on Sunday (London, England), September 3, 2017 | Go to article overview

Diana's Greatest Legacy: The Destruction of Our Monarchy


Byline: Peter Hitchens Read Peter's blog at hitchensblog.mailonsunday.co.uk and follow him on Twitter @clarkemicah COMMENT 27

WE ARE already living in a republic. We just don't know it yet. Diana Spencer, perhaps the most brilliant politician of our age, destroyed the British monarchy 20 years ago.

The current Queen continues to occupy the throne solely because she has been transformed by skilled public relations into the nation's favourite grandmother. Her sur vival is personal, not political. She goes through the motions of being the Sovereign, but is well aware that one false step could bring the weeping mobs out again, not weep ing but snarling, and who knows how that would end?

It began in those ghastly weeks in 1997 when all pretence ended that Britain contained a 'silent majority' which would one day assert itself and defy the moral and cultural revolution that was eating away at our country.

Millions, to be sure, whispered to each other in private places that they were not part of the strange semi-pagan festival of fake emo tion, as the crowds piled up their plastic-wrapped flowers and shed tears over a person they had never met. But they had no rallying point. They did nothing. They were cowed by a dictatorship of grief, even if the grief was largely self-pity. When the Blair creature appro priated Diana as a saint and martyr of New Labour, nobody contra dicted him. For alas, it was true. She really was the People's Prin cess, if by 'the People' you mean the new resentful Britain of wounded feelings, which utterly rejects all the old dutiful rules of behaviour, and which also has no time for, and no understanding of, hereditary monarchy.

In that moment was born the deadly, subversive idea that the true heir to the throne, Prince Charles, should never reign, but that we should 'skip a generation' and hand the vacant throne (when the vacancy inevitably comes) to Diana's son - because he is her son. …

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