In Memoriam


JEREMIAH D.SULLIVAN (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign), 77, was the head of the physics department at Illinois. A graduate of Carnegie Mellon University and Princeton University, he also studied at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Sullivan served on a variety of committees, including the Advisory Committee of the National Nuclear Security Administration and on a subcommittee of the NATO Science Committee. He died July 7, 2016.

PAUL STUART PEERCY (Berea College), 75, was professor emeritus and former dean at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He was a graduate of Berea College and the University of Wisconsin-Madison, member of several professional organizations, and served on several boards of directors. He died Oct. 20.

JAMES SHERMAN RUEBEL (Ball State University), 71, was dean of the honors college at Ball State University. A graduate of Yale and the University of Cincinnati, he previously served as president of the National Collegiate Honors Council Board. He died Oct. 9.

RONALD FRANCIS BORNE (The University of Mississippi), 77, served The University of Mississippi School of Pharmacy for thirty-seven years, eventually becoming vice chancellor for research. He was a graduate of Loyola University New Orleans, Tulane University, and The University of Kansas. He died Oct. 17.

LOUIS L. GERSON (University of Connecticut), 94, was a political science professor and former head of the political science department at the University of Connecticut. An Army veteran and native of Poland, Gerson was a graduate of the University of Connecticut and Yale. He was a Ford Foundation fellow, a Rockefeller Foundation fellow, and a Guggenheim fellow. He died Oct. 16.

DANNY A. BROWN (Western Carolina University), 70, was associate dean of student affairs at East Tennessee State University. He was a graduate of North Carolina State University, Western Carolina University, and the University of Massachusetts. Brown was the author or co-author of eighteen book chapters. He died Oct. 4.

RICHARD CREAL (University of Michigan), 86, was a former president of Prairie State College and a graduate of the University of Michigan. He also served at Lake Michigan College and the national College and University Personnel Association. He died Oct. 22.

LESTER ERVIN EHLER (Texas Tech University), 70, emeritus professor of entomology at the University of California-Davis, was the first biological control specialist on campus when he was hired in 1973. He was co-editor of Critical Issues in Biological Control and served as president of the International Organization for Biological Control. Ehler was a graduate of Texas Tech University and Berkeley. He died Sept. 2.

JOHN LEIGHTON MAKI (University of Wyoming), 63, was an Army veteran and graduate of the University of Wyoming. He worked for the Disabled American Veterans for 28 years and also served on the Advisory Committee on Disability Compensation at the Department of Veterans Affairs. He died June 3, 2016.

DICK A. LEABO (University of Michigan), 94, was vice president of The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi from 1977-1980. A graduate of The University of Iowa, Leabo was the author of five textbooks and twenty-five journal articles. Leabo was also a member of Gen. Claire Chennault's Flying Tigers in China. He won the Distinguished Flying Cross, the Air Medal, and six Battle Stars for his service in World War II. Leabo died Oct. 8.

NANCY KAISNER BRUCE BALL (Texas Tech University), 81, was a newspaper owner, editor, and publisher; library director; and nurse. She was a graduate of Odessa College, Texas Tech University, and Northwest Missouri State University. Ball died Nov. 22.

PHILIP GEORGE HENDERSON (University of Wisconsin-Madison), 80, was vice chairman and CEO of Frank Lynn & Associates, Chicago. A graduate of The University of Wisconsin-Madison and The University of Chicago, he also served as vice president of A. …

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