2017 Library Design Showcase

American Libraries, September-October 2017 | Go to article overview

2017 Library Design Showcase


Welcome to the 2017 Library Design Showcase, American Libraries' annual celebration of new and renovated libraries. These are shining examples of innovative architectural feats that address user needs in unique, interesting, and effective ways. Renovations and expansions dominated this year, showing that libraries are holding on to and breathing new life into spaces already cherished by their communities.

WOW FACTOR

* Vaughan (Ont.) Civic Centre Resource Library

The Vaughan Civic Centre Resource Library's sloped exterior cuts an impressive figure across the Canadian sky. Inside the two-story facility, a plethora of tools for 21st-century learning--3D printers, a media suite, and audio and video recording studios--are available, while movable book stacks allow staffers and patrons to morph spaces to suit their needs.

PROJECT: New construction

ARCHITECT: ZAS Architects Inc.

SIZE: 35,572 square feet

COST: $15.2 million Canadian ($12.2 million US)

PHOTO: DoubleSpace Photography

REVITALIZED CARNEGIES

* Norrington Center, Park University, Parkville, Missouri

Built in 1906, Norrington Center--the oldest Carnegie library remaining on a college campus in Missouri--is now a state-of-the-art academic commons that serves as a library and meeting place for the university. Renovations added collaborative and quiet areas, tech-enhanced classrooms for distance learning, and a coffee shop.

PROJECT: Renovation

ARCHITECT: Helix Architecture + Design

SIZE: 11,700 square feet

COST: $3.4 million

PHOTO: Michael Robinson

* Oregon City (Oreg.) Public Library

Oregon City's 104-year-old Carnegie library, which is listed in the National Register of Historic Places, received a massive face-lift that increased its size threefold while maintaining its historic charm. The additions include a centralized entryway, a new children's section, a reading room, community spaces, and increased tech capabilities.

PROJECT: Renovation and expansion

ARCHITECT: Scott | Edwards Architecture

SIZE: 20,200 square feet

COST: $6.9 million

PHOTO: Pete Eckert

HIGHER LEARNING

* Allan Price Science Commons and Research Library, University of Oregon, Eugene

Rising above the concrete plaza in the heart of the university's Lorry I. Lokey Science Complex, the renovated commons and research library now offers specially equipped, discipline-specific rooms for chemistry, human physiology, physics, geology, computer science, and biology studies; a big-data visualization lab; group-study areas; and a makerspace.

PROJECT: Renovation and expansion

ARCHITECT: Opsis Architecture

SIZE: 39,550 square feet

COST: $19.6 million

PHOTO: Opsis Architecture

* Alfred R. Goldstein Library, Ringling College of Art and Design, Sarasota, Florida

Nearly five times larger than the college's previous library, this new facility was built with a focus on art and design education. Ten group study areas, a special-projects workroom, and four terraces used for gatherings and as sketching spaces are complemented by iconic examples of furniture design by Eames, Heatherwick, and Gehry.

PROJECT: New construction

ARCHITECT: Shepley Bulfinch

SIZE: 46,000 square feet

COST: $20 million

PHOTO: Ryan Gamma

* Patricia R. Guerrieri Academic Commons, Salisbury (Md.) University

Salisbury University's new academic commons consolidates the university's academic support programs into one facility that also houses the library, classrooms, a cafe, a 400-seat assembly space, and the Nabb Research Center--a special collections library dedicated to the history and culture of Maryland's eastern shore.

PROJECT: New construction

ARCHITECT: Sasaki

SIZE: 226,000 square feet

COST: $117 million

PHOTO: Jeremy Bittermann

* James K. …

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