'Cloudy Vision Will Have Gone Day after Short Op' Cataracts Are Still the Leading Cause of Blindness and Vision Loss Worldwide. Here, Dan Morris, Consultant Ophthalmologist at the University Hospital of Wales and Nuffield Health Cardiff & Vale Hospitals, Explains More about the Condition

South Wales Echo (Cardiff, Wales), September 13, 2017 | Go to article overview

'Cloudy Vision Will Have Gone Day after Short Op' Cataracts Are Still the Leading Cause of Blindness and Vision Loss Worldwide. Here, Dan Morris, Consultant Ophthalmologist at the University Hospital of Wales and Nuffield Health Cardiff & Vale Hospitals, Explains More about the Condition


| What are cataracts and when they are likely to occur? A cataract is a clouding of the lens inside the eye, causing blurred vision and sometimes glare.

They usually develop gradually and affect distance vision first.

Most commonly cataracts affect individuals over 50 years of age - more than half of people over the age of 65 can expect to be affected by cataracts at some stage.

However, they can occur in any age group, especially after trauma or if you take steroids.

Fortunately, in almost every case, vision can be improved and restored to a good level using modern cataract surgery techniques, by replacing the cloudy lens with a new plastic lens usually under local anaesthesia.

| When is surgery recommended? Patients who are suffering visual problems and are suspected of having cataracts by their optician or GP are usually referred to the hospital eye service for further examination.

The ophthalmologist performs a full eye examination for diagnosis of cataracts and for making the clinical decision whether cataract surgery should be performed.

Measurements of your eyes will be taken to assess the strength of the artificial lens that you will need to replace your natural lens.

Normally if you have cataracts that affect your vision in both eyes, you'll need two separate operations, usually carried out eight weeks apart, to allow your first eye to heal.

| What happens during the operation? At the Nuffield Health Cardiff Bay Hospital, we have a skilled team of nursing staff and operating theatre technicians to ensure that the patient journey is as comfortable as possible - you will be looked after every step of the way. Everyone is understandably anxious about surgery on their eyes, but the experienced staff are able to put you at your ease to make it as painless and stress-free as possible.

The cloudy lens is removed and it is replaced with an artificial lens.

| How long does the procedure take? You are normally at the hospital for half a day. It is usually a straightforward procedure taking about half-anhour as a day case operation surgery under local anaesthetic, which means you will be awake.

It is not painful and, although the thought of someone operating on your eye can be terrifying, most people comment afterwards that it is not as bad as they thought it was going to be.

| How do you perform the lens removal? When you arrive, the nursing staff check your blood pressure to make sure you are fit for surgery, then put drops in your eyes to dilate your pupil.

I come and have a chat to answer any final questions and address any concerns. Then you are taken to the operating theatre where the anaesthetist makes the eye numb. …

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'Cloudy Vision Will Have Gone Day after Short Op' Cataracts Are Still the Leading Cause of Blindness and Vision Loss Worldwide. Here, Dan Morris, Consultant Ophthalmologist at the University Hospital of Wales and Nuffield Health Cardiff & Vale Hospitals, Explains More about the Condition
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