SOS! Stop Obesity Swiftly

Manila Bulletin, September 26, 2017 | Go to article overview

SOS! Stop Obesity Swiftly


By Cheshire Que, RND, RN, RD

We live in an obesogenic world. An environment that favors us to gain weight and store unwanted fats, especially in the abdominal area. Globally, obesity increases by one percent annually.

In the Philippines, the Food and National Research Institute (FNRI) showed recent data that obesity and overweight in the country are up to 24 percent, which has tripled from the last couple of surveys conducted. This has impacted the population's morbidity and mortality.

We may get used to family members and friends being a bit on the heavy side or you may be contented with the way you look, which is a good thing, but obesity is no joke. It is, after all, a risk factor for one too many diseases that will not only affect the individual but the rest of the family, their finances as well as one's productivity at work.

More importantly, intra abdominal or visceral fat is more dangerous than subcutaneous fat found in other parts of the body. An individual may have a normal BMI yet have high visceral fat which is highly associated with diabetes mellitus. Think "diabesity" because you may be thin on the outside but fat on the inside.

During the 23rd Annual Convention of the Philippine Association for the Study of Overweight and Obesity (PASOO) held at the Edsa Shangri-La Hotel on Aug. 31, immediate past president of the organization, Dr. Roberto Mirasol emphasized on obesity's impact on increasing risk for the following diseases:

Diabetes Mellitus

The Nurses' Health Study showed an age related relative risk of 40 in women with Body Mass Index (BMI) of 33 Kg/m2.

Hypertension

The Swedish Obesity Study showed 44 to 51 percent of obese women with baseline hypertension.

Dyslipedemia

Obesity is associated with elevated cholesterol, LDL or bad cholesterol, very low density lipoprotein (VLDL), triglycerides, apolipoprotein B, and a reduction in HDL or good cholesterol. All of these are related to the development of coronary artery disease, heart failure, and atrial fibrillation. …

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