DOUBLE CREAM; How Two Sons (and a Nephew) of Rock Legends Are on a Mission to Bring Back Supergroup's Music for a New Audience

The Mail on Sunday (London, England), October 1, 2017 | Go to article overview

DOUBLE CREAM; How Two Sons (and a Nephew) of Rock Legends Are on a Mission to Bring Back Supergroup's Music for a New Audience


Byline: John Dingwall

HE was a rock legend, famous as a founder of 60s supergroup Cream and notorious for the excesses of his rock and roll lifestyle. Now, three years after the death of bassist and vocalist Jack Bruce, his music will be played again in his native Scotland - by his son.

More than half a century after Bruce and his Cream bandmates Ginger Baker and Eric Clapton had a string of hits such as Sunshine of Your Love, Strange Brew and I Feel Free, Malcolm Bruce has landed a lucrative deal to perform his father's songs.

He is about to hit the road with The Music of Cream, a group he has formed with Baker's son Kofi and Clapton's nephew Will Johns.

The original Cream were active for a relatively short period, from 1966 to 1968, yet the group sold more than 40 million albums, toured the world and partied with stars such as Mick Jagger, Ringo Starr and Jimi Hendrix.

Now the next generation will be reinterpreting Cream hits at a string of gigs in the US and the UK, including Scotland.

But as the ink dries on 46-yearold Bruce's deal with billion-dollar concert promotions company Live Nation, he admits he is still coming to terms with the highs and lows of being the son of one of the most famous Scottish musicians of the 20th century. In an exclusive interview with The Scottish Mail on Sunday, Malcolm Bruce speaks openly for the first time about the dark side of his father, who died of liver cancer in 2014.

He tells how he once confronted the legendary musician regarding his heroin and alcohol addiction, only to be told that it was because he was 'f***ing Glaswegian'.

But he also reveals the tender side to his father, who on his death bed summed up his life modestly with the words: 'I got to play some notes.'

Yet his life was rather more complicated, as Bruce relates: 'My dad's shadow side was quite dark. He could be difficult and challenging with the drugs. He would say to me: "You've got to understand I was a product of my generation." We had a difficult relationship.'

At the height of his fame, Jack Bruce owned an island - Sanda, off the tip of the Kintyre peninsula - and collected a fleet of sports cars including a Ferrari, as well as a Rolls-Royce and a Daimler.

His son is living a more modest lifestyle, helping to load and unload his band's gear from a Toyota van at various Scottish bars, hotels and nightclubs during a string of live dates under his own name - The Music of Cream will come later.

'It's very rock 'n' roll to own an island,' Bruce reflects. 'But my dad recalled the shipyards, and would tell me all about the poverty in Glasgow. My dad was a working-class guy, removed from that life to having a Ferrari and doing what he wanted.

'He loved being a rock star, but he was very strong about his roots and where he came from. He also loved cars, and all the things stars like.

'He had a Rolls-Royce and I remember the smell of leather from the sports cars he had in the garage. By contrast, I am driving a rental van.' Of the planned Music of Cream concerts, Malcolm Bruce says: 'Live Nation are getting involved and we have 20-plus shows in the US.'

There will be Scottish dates on the UK leg of what is likely to become a world tour, celebrating the legacy of Clapton, Baker and Bruce.

JACK Bruce, born in Bishopbriggs on the outskirts of Glasgow, married US songwriter Janet Godfrey in 1964. Malcolm was born at their London home in 1970, a year before the family moved to Suffolk. He recalls: 'Home life was challenging. My dad would go off on tour and come back and spend time recuperating, then go off again, which meant he wasn't always emotionally available.

'I have memories of the drugs. It was the early and mid-Seventies, and it is what people were doing in the music business.' Jack's marriage to Janet ended in 1980. Their son recalls: 'Towards the end of my mum's marriage to dad, I remember arguments and shouting matches. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

DOUBLE CREAM; How Two Sons (and a Nephew) of Rock Legends Are on a Mission to Bring Back Supergroup's Music for a New Audience
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.