Elders Seem to Rally More of Their Brains for Short-Term Memory

Manila Bulletin, August 8, 2016 | Go to article overview

Elders Seem to Rally More of Their Brains for Short-Term Memory


SAN FRANCISCO -- Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley suggest brains that continue to perform well in old age, against odds that they are slower and less accurate in short-term memory compared to those of younger people, do so by rallying more of the brain to complete mental tasks.

"We think this pattern of increased connectivity between frontal regions and other modules in the brain reflects a more integrated network architecture that is key for successful performance of executive control tasks in aging," said UC Berkeley graduate student Courtney Gallen, who worked with her colleagues on a study published in the August issue of the journal Neurobiology of Aging.

Under the direction of her thesis adviser Mark D' Esposito, a UC Berkeley professor of psychology, the researchers compared 18 adults in their 20s to 38 healthy people age 60 and older.

They found that the older study subjects showed larger changes than younger subjects in the organization of brain networks between a task-free state and performing a task, and that those who did not exhibit this adaptation in brain signaling were less adept in performing tasks.

"Executive control" functions are thought to underlie humans' ability to flexibly change thinking and behaviors and to solve problems.

Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to track communication within specific brain sub-networks - called modules - and connections made across different modules, the researchers also found that the structural integrity of the superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF), which anatomically connects frontal and posterior brain regions important for short-term memory, was associated with older subjects' likelihood of exhibiting the transition to the more interconnected communication between brain regions that in turn was linked to better performance of tasks.

With focus on the frontal cortex, which is critical for executive functions, and its connections to other parts of the brain during fMRI scanning, the researchers asked participants to perform four different tasks in two-minute trials, with five trials assigned to each participant for each task. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Elders Seem to Rally More of Their Brains for Short-Term Memory
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.