Women's Political Participation

Manila Bulletin, March 15, 2016 | Go to article overview

Women's Political Participation


From its 9th ranking globally in gender equality in 2014, the Philippines moved up two notches in 2015 to be No. 7 among 145 countries. In the Asia-Pacific region, we now rank rank No. 1.

As we celebrate International Women's Day this year, we of course welcome this news, but at the same time should perhaps stop and reflect on what can be done to make this success sustainable. Maybe, a closer examination of the various areas of our economic and political life would show certain gaps - gaps in job positions, wages and leadership level, and gaps in political participation.

Political participation is more than voting. It includes the opportunity to speak out freely, freedom to associate and take active part in community life and public affairs. There are obstacles but they can be overcome with greater awareness of solutions and political will. Some are cultural and have been there over time such as patriarchal values. Women still lack adequate financial resources, and in the more rural areas lower levels of education and less access to information. In both urban and rural media, we still see considerable gender stereotyping. Both urban and rural women carry multiple burdens and family responsibilities.

Despite progress in several aspects of social and economic life, Filipino women have yet to show convincing indicators of growth in political participation. For example, how have our women candidates fared in recent national and local elections? A report based on data gathered in September, 2013 from the Philippine Commission on Women shows that during the automated elections in May, 2013, 19.7% or 3,503 of the elected posts, including ARMM, were won by women, a little higher than the 18.4% turnout in 2010. The number of women who filed candidacies was only 17.83% of the total number of candidates. Eight women ran, out of 33 senatorial candidates (24.2%), of which 4 entered the top 12 winning senators or 33.3%. Women participation in the 2010 senatorial elections was slightly lower at 23. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Women's Political Participation
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.