Point of View; Arts Education Promotes a Strong Society

By Hyatt, Kimberly L. | The Florida Times Union, October 19, 2017 | Go to article overview

Point of View; Arts Education Promotes a Strong Society


Hyatt, Kimberly L., The Florida Times Union


Byline: Kimberly L. Hyatt

The average life span of great civilizations is 215 years.

A first-rate arts education is one of the best means left to save our American experiment, now 241 years old.

I've come to this conclusion over 15 years working with the Cathedral Arts Project, an organization whose mission is to enrich our quality of life through unleashing the creative spirit of young people.

I had assumed the increasing diversity of our society would automatically generate broader understanding and mutual respect. I was wrong.

Today, my perspective has changed. I have witnessed the transformative power of the arts for students, families and our community.

Students who participate regularly in the arts show marked improvement in class participation, task completion, peer communication and conflict management. They also gain the insights, empathy and language needed to understand each other and, just as important, to understand themselves.

I hope that the unique potential of arts education will help us achieve our country's promise of E pluribus unum - out of many, one.

A total of 78 percent of Americans believe incivility and political dysfunction prevent our nation from moving forward.

A meta-analysis of 72 studies of 14,000 American college students between 1979 and 2009 revealed a drop of 40 percent in empathy scores.

Arts education has the potential, like nothing else, to mold both brains and hearts and open us to meaningful encounters where we look to not only our own interests but also the interests of others.

Students in CAP's ARTS Ignite! afterschool program begin each class by reciting a creed that involves five promises, the first of which is to "respect others and their ideas as I respect myself."

For our democracy to flourish, we must revive our ability to reason together and respect one another - no matter what.

As John Dewey put it, "Imagination is the chief instrument of the good."

How we treat another person and their ideas, he noted, depends on our power to put ourselves in another's place.

What lesson are we teaching our children when they see us unfriend someone on Facebook simply because we disagree? …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Point of View; Arts Education Promotes a Strong Society
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.