Sequels, Remakes, Reboots

Manila Bulletin, July 16, 2015 | Go to article overview

Sequels, Remakes, Reboots


JUST A THOUGHT: Life is what we make it, always has been, always will be. - Grandma Moses

* * *

ON MOVIE SEQUELS: There will always be great movies that we can never tire of, or have enough of.

Many times, we wish such and such film would have a sequel the following year, or maybe, after a few years. This is especially true of the movies we loved in childhood. However, not all of our wishes come true all the time.

Nowadays, however, when a movie becomes a big hit, it's almost sure as daylight that a sequel couldn't be far behind. It wasn't always this way. Back then, a Hollywood movie's box office standing wasn't a guarantee that it could merit a sequel. The idea then seemed tougher than the movie itself.

Thanks to changing consciousness, there has been a growing trend (and demand) for successful movies from the past to spring back to the present.

A case in point is the cult-classic "Dumb and Dumber" (1994). It took 20 years for the producers to release its sequel "Dumb and Dumber To." Like its original, it hit #1 at the box office on its opening.

* * *

A DECADE LATER: "Toy Story 3," "Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues," "The Best Man Holiday," and "The Godfather: Part III" are sequels that were released at least a decade after the preceding movie. They, too, struck gold at the worldwide box office. Some even won critical acclaim.

Some critics call the rise of sequels as "Hollywood running out of ideas," but movie fans refer to them as "answered prayers."

Demand for long-awaited sequels continue to grow. The trailers of upcoming movies, "Star Wars: Episode VII - The Force Awakens" and "Jurassic World" left fans excited for their release this year.

On the other hand, despite several announcements of planned sequels to certain movies, fans continue to hope (not against hope, hopefully) that much-awaited sequels will soon see the light of the silver screen. …

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