LIFE AT KAKUMA: Q&A with Wilson Kinyua, National Council of Churches of Kenya (PWRDF Partner)

Anglican Journal, October 2017 | Go to article overview

LIFE AT KAKUMA: Q&A with Wilson Kinyua, National Council of Churches of Kenya (PWRDF Partner)


The Kakuma Refugee Camp in Kakuma, Kenya, was established in 1992 to accommodate 70,000 refugees. By 2015, that number had grown to more than 180,000, according to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. Since 1994, PWRDF has been supporting the work in the camp of the National Council of Churches of Kenya.

Q What are the health challenges facing refugees in Kakuma?

A According to the UNHCR needs assessment for 2016, Kakuma refugees said they were affected by malaria, typhoid, skin conditions, HIV and AIDS and other sexually transmitted infections, pneumonia and tuberculosis. Interaction with the different communities means a breakdown of the social fabric.The family in transition is prone to challenges including gender-based sexual violence. Sexual activity is currently being used by the warlords as a tool of war, putting many youths and adolescents at risk of contracting diseases and unintended pregnancies.

Q Are people in the camps able to work or earn an income?

A There are no formal jobs available for the refugees, However each organization employs the refugees to work on various areas after some short training, work related mentorship and regular seminars. Some jobs are given to refugees to help them develop resilience as they prepare for their next move, such as resettlement or repatriation. Some refugees work as drivers.

Q How do people get food? Is there a problem with hunger?

A Food is distributed by the World Food Program, based on weight and family size. A food voucher enables refugees to purchase more food from selected vendors. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

LIFE AT KAKUMA: Q&A with Wilson Kinyua, National Council of Churches of Kenya (PWRDF Partner)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.