3-Day Diet


"O! he hath kept an evil diet long, And over-much consum'd his royal person" William Shakespeare (1564-1616), English playwright The Tragedy of King Richard III, Act 1. Sc 1 (1591)

In 1985, the 3-Day diet was a fad. It relied on a supposedly "unique metabolic reaction" that occurred when the specific elements of the diet were combined. It had to be followed strictly or else the desired result would not be seen. Thirty years later, it can still be accessed on the Internet and appears not to have been totally abandoned.

It's just too good to be true. But maybe it works. On the other hand, it could be your most dangerous self-experiment. This is a diet with no author, no esteemed institution behind it, and worst of all - no supporting statistical data. Yet it continues to be Googled. It retains its "last-chance" appeal to dieters scrambling to look their best for some event (maybe a wedding or a reunion).

The 3-Day Diet. Well, I saved you the trouble of downloading it. Here it is, unadorned. The main instruction is that it must be followed to the letter - no substitutions, no over- or under portions.

Day 1

Breakfast

Black coffee or tea, with 1-2 packets Sweet & Low or Equal

1/2 grapefruit or juice

1 piece toast with 1 tablespoon peanut butter

Lunch

1/2 cup tuna

1 piece toast

Black coffee or tea, with 1-2 packets Sweet & Low or Equal

Dinner

3 ounces any lean meat or chicken

1 cup green beans

1 cup carrots

1 apple

1 cup regular vanilla ice cream

Day 2

Breakfast

Black coffee or tea, with 1-2 packets Sweet & Low or Equal

1 egg

1/2 banana

1 piece toast

Lunch

1 cup cottage cheese or tuna

8 regular saltine crackers

Dinner

2 beef franks

1 cup broccoli or cabbage

1/2 cup carrots

1/2 banana

1/2 cup regular vanilla ice cream

Day 3

Breakfast

Black coffee or tea, with 1-2 packets Sweet & Low or Equal

5 regular saltine crackers

1 ounce cheddar cheese

1 apple

Lunch

Black coffee or tea, with 1-2 packets Sweet & Low or Equal

1 boiled egg

1 piece toast

Dinner

1 cup tuna

1 cup carrots

1 cup cauliflower

1 cup melon

1/2 cup regular vanilla ice cream

*In addition to its strict daily food prescription, dieters drink 4 cups of water or non-caloric drinks daily. …

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