EXCLUSIVE: Buying into Matthew McConaughey

Manila Bulletin, April 26, 2014 | Go to article overview

EXCLUSIVE: Buying into Matthew McConaughey


He appeared alongside Leonardo DiCaprio in the controversial film "The Wolf Of Wall Street," teaching his prot?g? that chest-thumping chant that would be the former's introduction into the insanity of life-altering money-making schemes.

Odd and memorable as that may be, it is Matthew McConaughey's dramatic portrayal as AIDS patient Ron Woodroof in "Dallas Buyers Club" that has given him some nifty rewards: a Golden Globe, a SAG Award and the coveted Best Actor Oscar early this year.

As Woodroof, McConaughey channeled a Lone Star hell-raiser and rodeo cowboy-slash-electrician who, in 1985, was diagnosed with AIDS. As a means to survive, Woodroof taught himself what he needed to know about treatments and started smuggling experimental drugs from other countries for himself and, later, for others. To hide from legal entanglement for selling unapproved medicine, he began charging fee for a club and gave out the drugs there for free.

Born and raised in Texas himself, McConaughey talks about Woodroof and his clan - whom he calls "wonderful rednecks" - with respect. "They weren't my immediate friends, but I know those people. I know that language, I know that perspective, I know that anarchic humor," he says.

More importantly, in bringing Woodroof to life, the actor wanted to stay true to the man's character. Woodroof may have eventually grown into a crusader for patients' rights but it has been a journey. "One of the things I wanted to make sure about this is to stick with that anarchic humor, stick with him being a selfish bastard, with him being a business man out for himself," he points out.

Aside from the awards (McConaughey's co-star Jared Leto also won Best Supporting Actor at this year's Oscars), the buzz around "Dallas" is also around the two stars' looks. …

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EXCLUSIVE: Buying into Matthew McConaughey
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