The Web


Even though we go online everyday, many of us did not notice that the Internet turned 25 last March 12. It was a quarter of a century ago when computer scientist Tim Berners-Lee proposed in a paper at CERN, the Geneva-based European Organization for Nuclear Research, a type of networked hypertext information management system. His idea soon became the World Wide Web. Why is this event mentioned in a column on photography? Because the Internet has undoubtedly become very instrumental in the development of photography as art, hobby, and business, especially in the last decade. Today, people routinely post, exchange, and sell photos through the Internet. (It would be hard to imagine what social networking sites would look like without the digital images.) Online we are able to view galleries and exhibits, dialogue with experts, and download necessary apps and software for improving our photos. And of course, the Internet has made it possible for your columnist to communicate with you and receive your photos for publication in Picture Perfect.

Interviewed by The Guardian on his brainchild's 25th anniversary, Tim Berners-Lee proposed a "a global constitution -- a bill of rights" to protect the people from the attempts by various governments to control the Internet (i.e., regulations, surveillance, censorship). "Unless we have an open, neutral Internet we can rely on without worrying about what's happening at the back door, we can't have open government, good democracy, good healthcare, connected communities, and diversity of culture," said Berners-Lee as he called for a "web we want" campaign to fight for an open Internet. "It's not naive to think we can have that, but it is naive to think we can just sit back and get it," he said. He urged users to draft an "Internet Users Bill of Rights for your country, for your region or for all."

Almost three weeks ago, this column mentioned the coming March 11 table tennis duel between former world champion Timo Boll and the German-made Kuka robot. Contrary to the expectations of many, the match held in Sofia, Bulgaria was not streamed live. Instead, an edited video filmed for a commercial was put online. The robot arm initially led 6-0. But Boll staged a rally to score 11 straight points and win the match. The victory of man over robot resulted in a collective sigh of relief from around the world according to Mashable.com.

Just a little over a month left to prepare for your participation in the World Pinhole Photography Day. Visit www.pinholeday.org for details, resources and links.

And now to our featured readers led by new photo contributors to the column.

Rio Christine Bustamante of UPLB sent in her take on the MoA Eye. …

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