The Symbolism of the Sunflower

Manila Bulletin, February 19, 2014 | Go to article overview

The Symbolism of the Sunflower


The computer game Plants versus Zombies has popularized the Sunflower among kids and kids at heart. This flower is certainly an iconic and important flowering plant both in the field of history, in horticulture and in the field of medicine. The plant can actually grow well here in the Philippines. It is now a seasonal and common annual summer plant at the University of the Philippines, especially in Diliman, Quezon City, where sunflowers are planted in the main entrance highway stretch toward the Administration Building facing the Oblation during graduation season. Some varieties do have the typical dinner plate-size flowers.

Though sunflowers are not native here in the Philippines, some tropical varieties really do grow very well here in the country. Scientifically known as Helianthus annuus and belonging to the Asteraceae plant family, it is the official flower of the University of the Philippines . This large and diverse plant family also includes the asters and the daisies, flowers which typically has a flower head. The sunflower symbolizes hope, as it depicts the appearance of the sun. It also symbolizes simplicity, having just one big flower on a stem, and at the same time complex as each flower holds hundreds of seeds.

The sunflower is an annual plant, possessing a large inflorescence or flower head. Its name was derived from its flower's shape and image, which looks like the sun. The typical plant has a rough, hairy stem, with broad, coarsely toothed, rough leaves and circular yellow-orange heads of flowers. The flower head is not just one flower, but actually consist of many individual flowerets which mature and dry into seeds, usually by the hundreds, on a receptacle base. Sunflowers commonly grow to heights between 1.5 to 3.5 meters or 5 to 12 feet.

Sunflowers grow best in full bright sun. Seeds are usually sown on the ground during summer. They grow best in fertile, moist, well-drained soil with organic matter. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

The Symbolism of the Sunflower
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.