Chinese Aircraft Carriers Not Intended for Any Country

Manila Bulletin, February 4, 2014 | Go to article overview

Chinese Aircraft Carriers Not Intended for Any Country


Manila, Philippines - The development of the Chinese navy, including the addition of two or more aircraft carriers, is not targeted at any particular country; it is aimed at strengthening China's maritime capability to defend the country against invasions from the sea.

Thus, according to state-owned news agency China Daily, any speculation by some Western media outlets about China's decision to upgrade it naval capabilities should be ignored.

It said China should instead "continue to modernize its navy at the needed pace and decide on how many aircraft carriers it needs after taking into account all the necessary factors..."

*9 With Aircraft Carriers

Nine countries have aircraft carriers. The United States, which has by far the largest fleet of aircraft carriers, plans to deploy six of them in the Pacific and four in the Atlantic. Russia has only one but is planning to build more, and the United Kingdom is building two Queen-Elizabeth-class aircraft carriers which could begin sea trials in 2017.

Even Italy has two aircraft carriers, and India recently bought its second from Russia, with its first indigenously built aircraft carrier being in the works.

At least nine countries have their own aircraft carriers with the United States having by far the largest fleet of aircraft carriers, it pointed out.

"This shows that having two or more aircraft carriers is normal for a regional or global power," the China Daily said in an article.

*China's Responsibilities

At the same time, it pointed out that China has a total coastline of 18,000 kilometers and more than 3 million square kilometers of sea area under its jurisdiction. As one of the five permanent members of United Nations Security Council, it has to shoulder global responsibilities.

"So a second aircraft carrier will not be beyond its requirement," the English language Chinese newspaper stressed.

"In fact, China needs two, if not more, aircraft carriers to strengthen its sea power and allow the People's Liberation Army Navy to better defend its sovereignty and national security."

*100 Tests

China's first aircraft carrier, the Liaoning, has conducted more than 100 tests and training tasks since early December when it began a training mission in the South China Sea, according to the Chinese navy.

The ship left its homeport of Qingdao, Shandong province, on Nov 26 and anchored at a naval base in Sanya, Hainan province, three days later. On Dec 5, it set out on the training mission, the Chinese navy reported.

Two missile destroyers, the Shenyang and Shijiazhuang, and two missile frigates, the Yantai and Weifang, participated in the mission. They escorted the carrier along the whole voyage from Qingdao to Sanya.

Cuz you're the one who makes me cry The development of the Chinese navy, including the addition of two or more aircraft carriers, is not targeted at any particular country; it is aimed at strengthening China's maritime capability to defend the country against invasions from the sea. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Chinese Aircraft Carriers Not Intended for Any Country
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.