Curriculum-Based Measurement of Reading Growth: Weekly versus Intermittent Progress Monitoring

By Jenkins, Joseph; Schulze, Margaret et al. | Exceptional Children, October 2017 | Go to article overview

Curriculum-Based Measurement of Reading Growth: Weekly versus Intermittent Progress Monitoring


Jenkins, Joseph, Schulze, Margaret, Marti, Allison, Harbaugh, Allen G., Exceptional Children


Abstract

We examined the idea that leaner schedules of progress monitoring (PM) can lighten assessment demands without undermining decision-making accuracy. Using curriculum-based measurement of reading, we compared effects on decision accuracy of 5 intermittent PM schedules relative to that of every-week PM. For participating students with high-incidence disabilities--all receiving special education reading instruction (N = 56)--intermittent schedules of PM performed as well as every-week PM. These findings signal a need for research on the relative accuracy and timeliness of curriculum-based measurement decision making for intermittent and weekly PM.

Regular monitoring of student progress is an essential component of individualized education programs (D. Fuchs & Fuchs, 1995) as well as response to intervention and other multitiered service systems (Gersten et al., 2008; National Center on Intensive Intervention [NCII], 2013; National Center on Response to Intervention [NCRTI], 2010). This article explores the idea that employing intermittent progress monitoring (PM) with curriculum-based measurement (CBM; Deno, 1985) can lighten assessment demands without undermining decision-making accuracy.

The CBM approach, Deno (2014) wrote, "originated in the field of special education where its original purpose was to be a tool that teachers could use to create data on student learning to aid them in modifying and improving instruction for students with high-incidence disabilities" (p. 172). Developed over 30 years ago, CBM remains the dominant special education assessment paradigm and a component "of all educational research-based training programs for teachers and school psychologists across the country" (Roberts, Wanzek, & Vaughn, 2012, p. 235). Deno's (1985) landmark article "Curriculum-Based Measurement: The Emerging Alternative" remains the most cited article in the 81-year history of Exceptional Children, leading Speece (2012) to describe the quantity of research on CBM as "staggering" (p. 184). Curriculum-based measures are widely employed in special education and in multitiered interventions. In a national study of response-to-intervention practices, interventionists reported that oral reading CBM was their primary tool for PM with students reading below grade-level benchmarks (Balu et al., 2015).

Reading CBMs take various forms: retell (L. S. Fuchs, Fuchs, & Hamlet, 1989), maze (L. S. Fuchs, Fuchs, Hamlett, & Ferguson, 1992), and word identification fluency (Zumeta, Compton, & Fuchs, 2012)--the most prominent of which is a 1 -min oral reading measure scored for words read correctly (WRC; Deno, Mirkin, & Chiang, 1982). In this article, we use oral reading CBM interchangeably with PM. Oral reading CBM's reliability and validity are thoroughly documented (e.g., Deno, 1985; Deno et al., 1982; L. S. Fuchs, Fuchs, Hosp, & Jenkins, 2001; L. S. Fuchs, Fuchs, & Maxwell, 1988; Jenkins, Fuchs, van den Broek, Espin, & Deno, 2003; Jenkins & Jewell, 1993; Marston, 1989; Reschly, Busch, Berts, Deno, & Long, 2009).

Data-Based Individualization

The National Center on Intensive Intervention's "data-based individualization" (DBI; NCII, n.d.-a) aligns with Deno's "CBM approach" (i.e., using data synergistically with intervention for data-driven adjustments to instruction). Teachers using CBM oral reading for DBI set a long-term growth goal, expressed as average weekly growth (e.g., one WRC per week), then monitor performance with weekly CBM. Every few weeks, teachers compare students' short-term growth in WRC with their growth goal, applying a decision guideline, such as "If the slope is the same or steeper than the goal line, keep the program going. If the slope is flatter than the goal line, change the program" (Mirkin et al., 1981, p. 121). Here, slope refers to students' PM slope (i.e., short-term average weekly progress), goal line to students' long-term growth goal, and change the program to revising some aspect of instruction if short-term progress is unsatisfactory. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Curriculum-Based Measurement of Reading Growth: Weekly versus Intermittent Progress Monitoring
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.