Editorial

By Croft, Janet Brennan | Mythlore, Fall-Winter 2017 | Go to article overview

Editorial


Croft, Janet Brennan, Mythlore


A LONG-EXPECTED UPDATE: I'm very pleased to be able to announce that the Mythlore archival website and online editorial management platform is now live. Though the generous sponsorship of Southwestern Oklahoma State University, Mythlore and the Mythopoeic Society now have an official online home for back issues of the journal, The Mythlore Index Plus, and, eventually, other publications and society archives. Phillip Fitzsimmons, Reference and Digitization Librarian at SWOSU (and a society member and contributor to this journal), spearheaded this project and has joined the society's leadership team as Administrator for Mythlore and Society Archives. The archive, as well as instructions for setting up an author account on the new platform, submitting articles, and tracking downloads of your contributions, is at http://dc.swosu.edu/mythlore/.

This issue begins with transcripts of both of the Guest of Honor Speeches from Mythcon 48, held this summer in Champaign, IL. In keeping with the conference theme and 50th Anniversary of the society itself, both talks dealt with research into our deep roots in the writings of the Inklings. Laura Schmidt decribes the collection of the Wade Center at Wheaton College in Wheaton, Illinois, which holds extensive archives of the works of our three key authors--Tolkien, Lewis, and Williams--as well as fellow Inkling Owen Barfield, Dorothy L. Sayers, George MacDonald, and G.K. Chesterton. Along the way we get a glimpse into the structure and uses of archives in general. William M. Fliss follows with his talk on the Tolkien Archive at Marquette University's Rayner Memorial Library in Milwaukee, Wisconsin--its origins, usefulness, and current reorganization project.

Our next paper, by returning author Weronika taszkiewicz, is a survey of trees and forests in fantasy literature, paying particular attention to works by Charles de Lint and Robert Holdstock and their evocations of the sacred, the numinous, and the mythologically potent through arboreal imagery. Brittani Ivan was the winner of this year's Alexei Kondratiev Student Paper Award at Mythcon, and her essay considers the border between the mundane world and the fantasy world; deliberately fluid and mobile in Diana Wynne Jones's Hexwood, and a solid presence central to the plots of Garth Nix's Old Kingdoms series.

Christopher Vaccaro examines a possible source of the imagery associated with Tolkien's representations of divine and queenly women in Alain de Lille's De Planctu Naturae, or Complaint of Nature. De Lille was a 12th century theologian and poet associated with the Chartres school, and an influence on Chaucer. Tolkien is also the subject of the next paper--in this case, Richard Angelo Bergen considers Tolkien's skilled evocation of evil and the way he mananges to hold Augustinian and Manichean conceptions of evil in balance, particularly in his decpiction of ores. …

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