Big Soda: Too Sweet to Fail?

By Kaplan, Cara | Fordham Urban Law Journal, August 2017 | Go to article overview

Big Soda: Too Sweet to Fail?


Kaplan, Cara, Fordham Urban Law Journal


Introduction                                             1268 I. How Could Something So Sweet Be So Dangerous?         1272  A. The Problem with Sugar                               1273  B. What Makes Soda So Bad?                              1275  C. Soda and the Obesity Crisis                          1277  D. Sugar versus Fat: How the Food Companies Sculpted     the Public Health Narrative                          1279 II. The Battle of the Bulge (aka, Love Handles)          1282  A. Federal Action: Lobbying and the Existing Revolving     Door                                                 1282  B. Successful Federal Regulation: The FDA Takes     Action                                               1285  C. Local Governments Take Action                        1287   1. New York City Soda Cap                              1287   2. Philadelphia Soda Tax                               1289  D. Self-Regulation Within the Industry                  1292  E. Consumer Product Liability Law                       1293  F. Obesity Litigation: Pelman v. McDonald's Corp.       1295  G. Tobacco Litigation                                   1298 III. The Bitter Truth of Potential Solutions             1302  A. Renewed Litigation Efforts: No Sugar-Coating         1303   1. Design Defect                                       1304   2. Failure to Warn                                     1305  B. Sweet Success: Increasing Local and State     Government Action                                    1310 Conclusion                                               1316 

INTRODUCTION

As much as Americans love sugar, overconsumption can turn something so sweet into something deadly. Excessive sugar consumption is linked to obesity and an increased risk of heart disease. (1) The rise in obesity rates is clearly correlated with the increase of sugar in the American diet--between 1980 and 1990, United States obesity rates rose parallel to increases in the production of sugar in the food supply, with similar trends continuing into the twenty-first century. (2) Obesity is a serious condition that can cause severe health problems (3) and even death. (4) Additionally, the estimated direct and indirect costs of obesity have risen to a staggering $190 billion each year. (5) Some experts adamantly assert that sugar is the cause of obesity and advocate that a reduction in sugar intake could have significant health benefits within the United States. (6)

Dr. William Dietz, a preventative health expert at George Washington University, explains that "[w]e know that sugar intake is an important contributor to obesity, and... soft drinks and soda and juices are a major source of sugar calories." (7) As a major source of sugar calories, sodas alone account for one third of daily American sugar consumption (8) and, therefore, reducing soda consumption is a meaningful way to reduce sugar intake. For example, a single twelve ounce can of Coca-Cola contains thirty-nine grams of sugar (or ten sugar cubes), approximately 156 and 108 percent of the daily recommended sugar intake that the American Heart Association ("AHA") recommends for women and men, respectively. (9) Sodas pose various health risks, as the ingredients in soda, most notably sugar, are linked to a number of health conditions, including "obesity, type 2 diabetes, coronary artery disease, stroke dental disease, bone disease, gout, asthma, cancers, rheumatoid arthritis, behavioral problems, [and possibly] addiction." (10) While many believe diet is an individual choice, large food corporations, including big soda companies, have undue influence over how society views nutrition, diet, and their specific products. (11) Individuals and governments should hold these large corporations, and specifically soda companies, accountable for creating products that contain extreme levels of sugar. Only then will the companies be forced to acknowledge the inherently dangerous qualities of their products and modify them to create a safer dietary environment for children and adults alike. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Big Soda: Too Sweet to Fail?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.