PCI Invite to Roman Catholic Leaders Raises Serious Doctrinal and Spiritual Issues

The News Letter (Belfast, Northern Ireland), September 29, 2017 | Go to article overview

PCI Invite to Roman Catholic Leaders Raises Serious Doctrinal and Spiritual Issues


In inviting Roman Catholic leaders to speak at its autumn seminars commemorating the 500th anniversary of the Protestant Reformation, Union Theological College of the Presbyterian Church in Ireland (PCI) raises a number of serious historical, doctrinal, confessional and spiritual issues.

Rome excommunicated the Reformers, slew the martyrs and repeatedly anathematised (ie, cursed) the blessed Reformation gospel of Jesus Christ at its Council of Trent (1545-1563).

In the last five centuries, Rome has continued to promulgate the same false doctrines -- without reforming any of them! -- that Martin Luther in Germany, and others throughout Europe and the British Isles, faithfully exposed: its money-grubbing indulgences; its sacramental system, which dispenses well-nigh automatic grace to all partakers and adds unscriptural sacraments; its soul-destroying heresy of justification before God by man's own will and works; its idolatry, including praying to angels and saints; its Christ-dishonouring papacy; etc.

Rome has even increased its heresies since the Reformation through its unbiblical claim that Mary was conceived without original sin (1854) and its pretence that the pope is infallible (1870).

Moreover, modern Rome is filled with higher criticism of Holy Scripture, liberal theology, evolutionism and political correctness.

Its scandalous failure in church discipline regarding priests who sexually abused children, particularly boys, in countries all around the world for decades is well known.

If the PCI is really interested in the Reformation, it should imitate Luther and the other Reformers by courageously setting forth in pulpit and print the truth of the Bible, and refuting the lie (including Rome), without any compromise.

The power of God's authoritative Word must be elevated far above man's vain words, and the liberating fear of God must drive out the crippling fear of man.

The PCI, like Luther, must teach the truth of original sin, including man's radical inward sinfulness, lust and pride; the bondage of man's will and its freedom by sovereign grace alone; the non-imputation of sins and the reckoning of those ungodly in themselves as righteousness before God, based only upon Christ's substitutionary sufferings and perfect obedience, and received by faith alone; God's eternal, unconditional predestination; etc.

The PCI must follow Luther's insistence on thorough instruction of the children of the church so that they know the Holy Scriptures, and memorise the catechism and know what it means. The Reformation honoured God's infallible Word and was creedal, so it called parents to keep their baptismal vows to train their children in the Christian faith.

Also church discipline should be exercised upon all in the PCI who remain impenitent in their sins, including false ecumenists with Rome; female ministers, elders and deacons; modernists; theistic evolutionists; etc. …

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