Honor Killing and the Indigenous Peoples: Cultural Right or Human Right Violation?

By Alsabti, Sarah | Denver Journal of International Law and Policy, Summer 2017 | Go to article overview

Honor Killing and the Indigenous Peoples: Cultural Right or Human Right Violation?


Alsabti, Sarah, Denver Journal of International Law and Policy


I. INTRODUCTION

Many sources define honor killing as the premeditated murder of a girl or a woman. (1) The murderer who commits this crime is usually one of the girl's or woman's family members like her brother, father, or a combination of male agnates. (2) The murderer commits this crime to restore the family's social reputation. (3) The killer believes he is preserving the family's honor by using methods like shooting, stoning, burning, burying alive, strangling, smothering, and knifing the victim to death.4

This premeditated murder is the result of the woman's unacceptable behavior. An example of unacceptable behavior would be an extra-marital sexual relationship. (5) Another example would be a pre-marital relationship with a male that is not approved by the family for the single woman. (6)

Honor killing is not a new phenomenon. In fact, honor killing has existed since Ancient Roman times. (7) Since that time, honor killings have been recorded in many countries. (8) This global phenomenon has occurred in developed countries as well as developing countries. (9) Honor killings have taken place in many countries such as the United States, Afghanistan, Brazil, Israel, Egypt, Pakistan, Palestine, and Jordan. (10)

Unfortunately, honor killing is not just part of human history; it still exists in the current century. In 2000, the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) concluded that there are at least 5,000 honor killings worldwide every year. (11) When the issue of honor killing is discussed under the international spotlight, Jordan and Pakistan are the two countries that garner the most attention. (12)

Honor killing is a part of Jordan's contemporary society. The population of Jordan is estimated to be 6.5 million inhabitants. (13) A recent report by Rana Husseini estimates that there are about twenty honor killings every year in Jordan. (14) My motivation to write this Article stems from the death of these twenty individuals. This Article focuses on the honor killing situation in Jordan. Section II of this Article discusses domestic law and the cultural context. Part A of Section II illustrates honor killing in the Arabic culture, including an interview with a murderer and his judge to illustrate the society's power. Part B of Section II describes the domestic law in Jordan which does not provide deterrent punishment or sufficient protection for women. Section III is a cultural relativism legal analysis. This section begins by explaining the ideas of cultural relativism and universalism. This section includes some of the international laws that address the indigenous people and their right to practice honor killing in their culture. It includes two international laws: International Labor Organization Convention No. 169 (15) and United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. (16) Section IV focuses on the international human rights legal analysis. This section starts with general information about the United Nations and its point of view about the violence against women in general and honor killing specifically. Then it describes the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women, the Declaration on the Elimination of Violence Against Women, and United Nation resolutions. The last section of this Article, Section V, explains Jordan's efforts to follow the international legal community's decisions and recommendations to solve the honor killing issue.

II. DOMESTIC LAW AND CULTURAL CONTEXT.

This section is a spotlight on Jordan's current situation. It includes information about the Jordan cultural context and the domestic law that addresses honor killing.

A. Honor Killing in the Arabic Culture.

Human sacrifice is a historical aspect of cultures around the world. The reasons for human sacrifice vary. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Honor Killing and the Indigenous Peoples: Cultural Right or Human Right Violation?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.