Using the 5es to Teach Seasonal Changes

By Ashbrook, Peggy | Science and Children, December 2017 | Go to article overview

Using the 5es to Teach Seasonal Changes


Ashbrook, Peggy, Science and Children


Science educators of all ages of children feel the pressure to complete a lesson or activity or shorten an exploration to stay within the daily schedule. Having a lesson plan helps teachers schedule enough time for extended learning, which helps children become engaged and interested in a concept before they start exploring it. A lesson plan also helps teachers set up time for children's open exploration before they learn content. Instructional models can help us plan. The 5E instructional model was developed more than 25 years ago by the Biological Sciences Curriculum Study (BSCS) team (Bybee 2014). The team created this instructional sequence of five phases--engage, explore, explain, elaborate, and evaluate--for elementary education, not preschool learning, but this framework also supports science learning in the early years.

Exploring the question, "What is a season?" begins with helping students understand changes in weather phenomena such as air temperature. Although subjective observations can be made without any measuring tools, including measurements of temperature will help children make comparisons between current and past observations of changes in weather.

Use the BSCS 5E instructional model to begin an exploration that children will build upon as the seasons progress. …

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