Face 2 Face in Ottawa

By Osterer, Irv | Arts & Activities, December 2017 | Go to article overview

Face 2 Face in Ottawa


Osterer, Irv, Arts & Activities


One of the most important mandates that secondary schools in Canada have is to ensure that young adults understand their role in the community.

When Ottawa Education Programs Officer, Olga Zeale, contacted our art department about a special project to highlight Canadian Archives Awareness Week, I knew our students would enthusiastically embrace the task, which they did.

To meet the criteria required for this exhibit, the 11thgrade graphic-design class, with students in the Communication & Design FOCUS group, worked on a series of 50 portraits that presented a panorama of personalities that spent a significant part of their lives in our nation's capital, Ottawa.

In some cases the subjects were assigned, while other students asked if they could work on portraits that had personal or cultural significance to them. The students were asked to integrate some of the elements attributed to their subject.

THE FINISHED WORK shows a wide variety of techniques and styles. Merivale's art department has embraced an approach to information graphics that brings some of the "craft" back to the art world.

Students were encouraged to experiment with watercolor, pastels, pencil crayons, acrylics, collage, ink, and even oil bars, on these terrific pieces. We do this without turning our back on the latest computer software and image-enhancing technologies, which were also used when necessary.

The portraits include prominent athletes, actors, writers, artists, musicians, politicians, clergy, scientists, philanthropists, astronauts and social activists that had a connection to the city. Among the most popular artworks was the very impressive watercolor study of Olympic figure-skating champion Barbara Ann Scott, created by Nadia.

Amar's wonderful portrait of photographer Yousuf-Karsh featured a three-dimensional element to give the illusion of a camera with an inverted, backwards image of the artist mounted in the faux lens.

WELL OVER 200 PEOPLE ATTENDED the impressive "vernissage" (private viewing), organized for the students and their parents at the Canadian Archives' gallery. The city of Ottawa also helped promote the event with invitations, posters and a Facebook page. A special Face2Face poster that included every portrait in the show was printed with the help of Kerry Thompson at the IDP Group's Renfrew, Ontario plant.

For most of the students, this represented their first opportunity to show their work in a gallery and interact with the public. It was a terrific experience.

Arts & Activities Contributing Editor Irv Osterer is Department Head--Fine Arts and Technology at Merivale High School in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

High-school students will ...

* create a thematic piece for a community/city sponsored event. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Face 2 Face in Ottawa
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.