PROSTATE DIAGNOSIS SHAME; Men Wait 4 Times as Long for Results as Women with Breast Cancer Symptoms

Daily Mail (London), December 19, 2017 | Go to article overview

PROSTATE DIAGNOSIS SHAME; Men Wait 4 Times as Long for Results as Women with Breast Cancer Symptoms


Byline: Ben Spencer Medical Correspondent

MEN with symptoms of prostate cancer wait four times longer for a diagnosis than women with suspected breast cancer, an audit has revealed.

It takes 56 days, on average, from the time a man first reports symptoms to a GP for him to be confirmed with prostate cancer.

For breast cancer it takes just 14 days, largely thanks to the national screening programme of regular mammograms.

Experts have long warned that delayed diagnosis is a key reason British cancer survival rates lag behind other Western nations. Health officials have set a target for all cancer patients to be diagnosed within 28 days by 2020, but the study, which tracked nearly 19,000 people diagnosed with cancer in 2014, reveals that hitting that is a long way off.

For cancers of all types it takes an average of 40 days for someone to be given a definite diagnosis, the researchers for Public Health England revealed. And more than a fifth of patients experience avoidable delays along the way, they found.

The findings, published in the British Journal of General Practice, reveal the gulf in outcomes between different cancer types.

Breast cancer receives the quickest diagnosis of two weeks, on average, with 75 per cent being diagnosed within 19 days and 92 per cent diagnosed within 60 days.

For prostate cancer, which has one of the slowest diagnosis speeds, the average wait is 56 days, and a quarter of men have to wait 126 days - more than four months. Kidney cancer also takes a long time to diagnose, with an average of 66 days.

While screening for breast cancer is routine - with middle-aged women invited for scans every three years - tests for prostate cancer are haphazard, and more accurate tools are yet to make it out of the laboratory.

Professor Helen Stokes-Lampard, chairman of the Royal College of GPs, said: 'GPs in the UK have some of the worst access to diagnostic tools in Europe.

'We need better access to both existing and emerging tests and imaging tools that could help us identify cancers, particularly those with symptoms that are more difficult to spot.' A two-week target for a woman with suspected breast cancer to receive diagnostic testing was also introduced in 2010 after a campaign by charities - a target that does not exist for other cancers.

Men over the age of 50 are eligible for a 'PSA' blood test which gives doctors a rough idea of whether they are at risk of prostate cancer. But it is infamously unreliable, and men who get a positive result are usually sent for a biopsy for confirmation.

The NHS is beginning to use more accurate MRI scans in place of biopsies, but not every hospital has the equipment.

Prostate cancer is the most common male cancer, with 47,000 British men diagnosed and 10,900 killed each year. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

PROSTATE DIAGNOSIS SHAME; Men Wait 4 Times as Long for Results as Women with Breast Cancer Symptoms
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.