Decoding Disorder: A Review of a World in Disarray by Richard Haass

By Desai, Noopur | Journal of International Affairs, Summer 2017 | Go to article overview

Decoding Disorder: A Review of a World in Disarray by Richard Haass


Desai, Noopur, Journal of International Affairs


"What exists in many parts of the world as well as in various venues of international relations resembles more of a new world disorder. If there were a publicly traded stock called 'World Order Incorporated,' it would not have crashed, but it would have suffered a correction, losing at least 10 percent of its value," writes Richard Haass in A World in Disarray (1) In his grounded view of the current geopolitical landscape, Haass tries to answer questions about the increasing disorder in the world. This three-part book sheds light on the history of the world, analyzes current international affairs, and offers a road map for how to deal with the challenges of what might come next.

Haass explains that Brexit and the U.S. elections are indications that large, powerful democracies are rejecting the idea of globalization. If you add to these the current unravelling of the Middle East, Europe's instability, terrorism, climate change, the threat of nuclear proliferation, low economic growth, populism, and cybersecurity, "it is painfully evident that the twenty-first century will prove extremely difficult to manage."

In the third part of the book, Haass argues that the world needs an updated operating system--a world order 2.0--that accounts for new challenges and other stakeholders, going beyond state actors. Haass introduces the concept of sovereign obligation that informs how governments think about legitimacy and involves governments' obligations to other governments and their citizens. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Decoding Disorder: A Review of a World in Disarray by Richard Haass
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.