Health & Human Services

Michigan Academician, Fall 2017 | Go to article overview

Health & Human Services


An Investigation of the Relationship between School Social Workers' Personal Contact, Professional Development, and Attitudes toward Children Impacted by HIV/AIDS. Leona Mickles-Burns, Marygrove College

HIV positive school age children experience discrimination, ostracism, and negative attitudes by professionals who service them. These children are in need of academic, emotional, social, and behavioral support. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between exposure to persons with HIV, professional development, and the attitudes and behavior of school social workers toward students who are HIV positive. This study analyzed data from twenty-four New York Department of Education school social workers, who took part in completing the School Professionals' Attitude towards AIDS survey. The results of Pierson's r, t test and multivariate analysis revealed that exposure to persons with HIV/AIDS contributed to school social workers more positive attitude and behavior towards students who are HIV positive. In addition, the t test found no relationship between professional workshops on HIV/AIDS and attitudes. The study concluded with implications for improved service delivery, intervention, and treatment of HIV positive school age children.

Investigating the Relationship among Patient Experience, Hospital Types, and Financial Performance of For-Profit, Non-Profit, and Governmental Hospitals in the United States. Lihua Dishman, Lawrence Technological University

Patient experience (PX) and financial performance (FP) are among top priorities of hospital leaders today as the US payment systems shift from volume-based to value-based. To fill some gaps in extant empirical literature, this study aimed at investigating the relationship between PX and FP of US for-profit, non-profit, and governmental hospitals when hospital type (HT) moderated this relationship over a four-year (2009-2012) period. The final sample was comprised of 1,377 US Medicare-certified inpatient acute-care hospitals that reported HCAHPS survey results and financial data consecutively. The unit of analysis was hospitals. The independent, moderating, and dependent variables were PX, HT, and FP, respectively. Secondary analyses of archival data were performed using various descriptive and inferential statistical techniques. Three empirical findings emerged: PX impacted FP; HT moderated the relationship between PX and FP; and the governmental hospital type demonstrated the greatest moderating effect on the relationship between PX and FP. Study results answered the two research questions: (1) PX impacted FP; and (2) HT impacted the relationship between PX and FP. Descriptive findings also indicate: PX improved gradually over 2009-2012; and relative to PX, for-profit and governmental hospitals consistently outperformed non-profits, smaller hospitals consistently outperformed larger hospitals, and rural hospitals consistently outperformed urban hospitals. In conclusion, hospitals outperformed in patient experience outperformed financially.

One Tale from Two Surveys: How Do Hospital CEOs in Midwestern Region Perceive Leadership Competencies of Health Administration Graduates?

John W. Fick, Siena Heights University; Lihua Dishman, Lawrence Technological University; Katherine Adler and Letha Williams, A. T. Still University

Personnel shortages have remained among the top five concerns of US hospital CEOs in recent years (American College of Healthcare Executives, [ACHE], 2014, 2015, 2016), illuminating urgent needs for health administration educators to assess whether their graduates possess requisite leadership competencies. Two sequential cross-sectional observational studies were conducted. In each study, data were collected from midwestern hospital CEOs who were ACHE fellows (FACHE), using a self-developed survey instrument. The study period was 2013 and 2015, respectively. Both studies' unit of analysis was midwestern hospital CEOs. …

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