Creating Interactive E-Books through Learning by Design: The Impacts of Guided Peer-Feedback on Students' Learning Achievements and Project Outcomes in Science Courses

By Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Tu, Nien-Ting et al. | Educational Technology & Society, January 2018 | Go to article overview

Creating Interactive E-Books through Learning by Design: The Impacts of Guided Peer-Feedback on Students' Learning Achievements and Project Outcomes in Science Courses


Hwang, Gwo-Jen, Tu, Nien-Ting, Wang, Xiao-Ming, Educational Technology & Society


Introduction

As educational settings and strategies have become more diverse, technology-based teaching has gradually become one of the trends in education (Chu, 2014). The popularity of tablet computers and the development of digital reading technologies such as multimedia and interactive facilities have brought the use of e-books as a learning tool under the spotlight (Jenny et al., 2015; Huang & Liang, 2015). Meanwhile, "developing e-books" has become a popular project-based learning activity in schools (Colombo & Landoni, 2013). Scholars have indicated that this approach of learning by design has great potential for fostering students' innovative thinking and learning achievement if appropriate learning support is provided (Huynh & Ghimire, 2015; Hwang, Hung, & Chen, 2013). In the meantime, researchers have stated the necessity of adopting learning guiding strategies in such project-based activities to enhance students' learning performance and project quality (Tseng & Tsai, 2007).

Among various learning strategies, learning by design is a well-recognized one, based on constructivism, in which students need to think about what the important parts of the learning content are through the design process, and how to present the key concepts fully to others (Harel, 1991; Jonassen & Carr, 2000). In comparison with conventional instruction, the mode of learning by design allows students to participate more actively and construct their own knowledge step by step for meaningful learning (Minovic, Milovanovic, Evic, Minovic, & Evic, 2011).

In addition, engaging students in peer-feedback is also one of the learning strategies that have positive impacts on students' learning motivation, attitudes and achievement (Lai & Hwang, 2015; Tseng & Tsai, 2007; Hwang, Hung, & Chen, 2013). It refers to the learning activities that engage students with similar backgrounds in assessing the learning outcomes of peers by playing the role of an instructor, including sharing knowledge and giving feedback or suggestions. Via peer interactions and feedback, students not only have more innovative ideas, but also learn to make reflections through viewing peers' work.

Most previous studies related to peer feedback were conducted for older age groups (e.g., college or high school students), who were asked to complete artworks, videos or system development projects, such as websites, computer programs or digital games (Ali, Heffernan, Lambe, & Coombes, 2014; Hsia, Huang, & Hwang, 2016; Tseng & Tsai, 2007). In addition to learning achievement, these studies mainly measured students' learning motivation, attitudes or the correlations between these variables. Few studies have been conducted to investigate younger students' innovative thinking and project outcomes as well as their learning achievement and cognitive load, not to mention adopting interactive e-books (i.e., e-book with interactive features) as the target of learningby-design and peer-feedback activities. Therefore, in this study, an approach of integrating the guided peer-feedback strategy into e-book design was proposed for younger groups. To evaluate the effectiveness of this approach, an experiment was performed on an elementary school science course to investigate the following research questions:

* Can the guided peer feedback-based e-book development approach improve students' learning achievements in comparison with the conventional e-book development approach?

* Can the guided peer feedback-based e-book development approach improve students' project outcomes in comparison with the conventional e-book development approach?

* Can the guided peer feedback-based e-book development approach promote students' innovative thinking tendency in comparison with the conventional e-book development approach?

* Can the guided peer feedback-based e-book development approach reduce students' cognitive load in comparison with the conventional e-book development approach? …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Creating Interactive E-Books through Learning by Design: The Impacts of Guided Peer-Feedback on Students' Learning Achievements and Project Outcomes in Science Courses
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.