Psychosocial Interventions among Children and Adolescents

By Jayarajan, Deepak; Jacob, Preeti | Indian Journal of Psychiatry, February 2018 | Go to article overview

Psychosocial Interventions among Children and Adolescents


Jayarajan, Deepak, Jacob, Preeti, Indian Journal of Psychiatry


Byline: Deepak. Jayarajan, Preeti. Jacob

Substance use disorders in children and adolescents are a significant cause of concern as they can have long term implications in practically every sphere. The etiological factors that contribute to substance use disorders are complex and the formulation must amalgamate and synthesize all the different factors including the predisposing, perpetuating, precipitating and protective factors in order to plan management. Interventions must stem from this comprehensive formulation and must be child-focused, multidisciplinary, multisystemic, with strong family participation and community involvement. The treating team must actively collaborate with the young person and help him/her understand the rationale for treatment in order for them to engage in it. Assessment and treatment of comorbidities are an important part of intervention package. Skill training for problem solving, emotional regulation, social skills, and communication are an essential part of the treatment for substance use disorders in adolescents. Relapse prevention strategies, including how to seek help when there is a lapse must be part and parcel of the interventions delivered to the young person. Substance use disorder interventions must be part of a larger plan that addresses other areas of concern in the young person's life. While there are few studies, and so a relatively weak and preliminary evidence base for pharmacotherapeutic interventions, early evidence shows that their combination with psychosocial interventions may have a synergistic effect on substance use reduction. Substance use disorders affect the entire family and the community at large and thus must be treated holistically, but by individualising the treatment to suit the needs of that particular child and family.

Introduction

Interventions for substance use disorders (SUD) in children and adolescents are often complex as the child/adolescent rarely seeks treatment or help on his/her own. More often than not they are brought by the family with requests from them for the most restrictive kind of treatment available. Due to this coercion, during the initial process of treatment seeking, there is a certain degree of hostility and mistrust, especially from the child/adolescent towards the treating team, right at the beginning of treatment. In order to counter the hostility associated with treatment against their will or without their expressed consent, the treating team must have an empathetic, understanding, respectful, and non-judgmental stance. Apart from this, another aspect that is difficult to navigate is the child's and parents' distinct goals and requirements for treatment. This again is complex, as while the child/adolescent is the primary client, the parent is the guardian and ultimately gives consent for various aspects of treatment. Herein lie issues of confidentiality and the limits of confidentiality that the child/adolescent must be told about at the beginning of treatment such that treatment can be as transparent a process as possible. Ensuring the transparency, confidentiality, and allowing for participatory decision making often times reassures the child/adolescent and they may be more willing to take part in the treatment process. Rapport and relationship building with the child/adolescent and their family is another important area that the clinician needs to keep in mind as the subsequent success of treatment depends on the strength of the therapeutic alliance.[1],[2]

There is no doubt in anyone's mind that adolescents cannot receive the same treatment as adults. The benefit of including the family in the treatment process is also well established.[3] Given that the risk factors for substance use disorders are varied and multi-factorial, any intervention can begin only with a good understanding of the problem behaviour, which includes the substance use history. History must be obtained from the child/adolescent at first in order to foster trust. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Psychosocial Interventions among Children and Adolescents
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.