WRITE STUFF; INSPIRATIONAL YOUNG STORYTELLERS' CREATIVITY CELEBRATED IN SQA BOOK; Special Collection Showcases the Essays, Prose, Poetry and Drama of Talented Scottish Students and Aims to Encourage Other Youngsters to Get on the Write Track

Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland), February 16, 2018 | Go to article overview

WRITE STUFF; INSPIRATIONAL YOUNG STORYTELLERS' CREATIVITY CELEBRATED IN SQA BOOK; Special Collection Showcases the Essays, Prose, Poetry and Drama of Talented Scottish Students and Aims to Encourage Other Youngsters to Get on the Write Track


Byline: KATRINA TWEEDIE reporters@dailyrecord.co.uk

CREATIVITY is flourishing amongst Scottish students, whose talents are showcased in a new book of essays, prose, poetry, and drama.

Write Times 2, published by the Scottish Qualifications Authority, is an inspiring reminder of the wealth of talent across our nation.

2018 is the Year of Young People and the SQA hopes the book will encourage young people with creative ambitions.

Written by SQA candidates as part of their English courses at National, Higher, and Advanced Higher level, it also includes selected work from students who have achieved the Creative Industries: Media and Communication Higher National Certificate at college.

Copies of Write Times 2 will be sent to every school and college across the country and a free e-book version is also available to download Among the young authors from across Scotland to have their work collected in the book is Mahee Mustafa, from Glasgow, whose poem about his Indian grandfather was selected for the evocative images it created.

Another highlight comes from Dundee student Hannah Cowieson, who projects the real-life consequences of Cinderella's rendezvous with a fairy godmother, and the implications of her manufactured meeting with Prince Charming, challenging the very notion of 'Happy Ever After'.

Michelle Musyoka, who attends Eastwood High School in Renfrewshire, used her essay in her National 5 English course to reflect upon her parents' decision to expose her to both Kenyan, and Scottish influences as part of her cultural upbringing.

Orla Davey, a pupil from St Margaret's Academy in Livingston, used her National 5 English writing assignment to challenge the notion that teenagers are all in favour of social media, championing the simple pleasures of a good book.

In her essay I'd Rather Read Books than Waste my Time on Social Media, she offers a refreshing perspective on the popularity of social media among her peers, believing too many teenagers are computer addicts, even though reading books can be much better.

Orla is delighted her work has been published in Write Times 2: "It feels really good because I've been writing from a young age. I never thought I'd come this far and it's really amazing."

Rona Learmouth, from Anderson High School in Lerwick features in the prose fiction section of the book. In her short story, Stops, she explores the idea that, on public transport, you travel with strangers whose stories you will never know.

While Buckie High School pupil Katie Wilson used the Doric dialect native to the north east of Scotland to write a touching essay - Becus a hae a sister a hae a friend - about her bond of with her younger sister.

Both writers attended the Write Times 2 launch event in Glasgow.

Katie said: "I was really surprised when I got the email. It's really good to be here to experience it."

Deputy First Minister John Swinney, who joined the youngsters at the book launch, added: "There are many different types and styles of writing on display, and our young writers have excelled in every one. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

WRITE STUFF; INSPIRATIONAL YOUNG STORYTELLERS' CREATIVITY CELEBRATED IN SQA BOOK; Special Collection Showcases the Essays, Prose, Poetry and Drama of Talented Scottish Students and Aims to Encourage Other Youngsters to Get on the Write Track
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.