Tried & True Tips for Art Teachers

By Lubiner, Glenda | Arts & Activities, March 2018 | Go to article overview

Tried & True Tips for Art Teachers


Lubiner, Glenda, Arts & Activities


"What would life be if we had no courage to attempt anything?"

--Vincent van Gogh

What would life be if we had no courage to attempt anything? Well, we have a lot to look forward to and a lot to attempt this month. March brings to us Women in History Month, Youth Art Month, and Music in Our Schools Month. Wow! That's a lot to take in.

This is a great time to celebrate all the famous women in art and women artists. For Youth Art Month, hang artist's quotes and their portraits around your school. This is also a great time to educate the students and parents on the importance of art education. Compile a list of careers that art education can lead to and have discussions or even debates with your students.

March is a great time to collaborate with your music teacher to have a night of the arts and be sure to invite your community leaders. This month our focus is on drawing, color media and projects inspired by books, literature, music, and dance.

tip #1

BABY, BABY, BABY OIL? Try using baby oil to soften the look of a colored pencil drawing. The key, however, is not to use too much oil. There are two ways of using baby oil in your drawings. First, draw as you normally would. The next step is to dip a cotton swab in some baby oil, blot it on a paper, then smooth over the colors in your drawing. It will give your drawing a smoother look, almost like using watercolor pencils.

An alternate way to do this is to start by applying a light layer of baby oil on your paper with a cotton ball or a wash paintbrush, then add your colored pencils. This will produce a smooth, rich look to your drawing.

tip #2

WATERCOLOR MADE EASY. Have your students use a limited palette, especially if they are using watercolors for the first time. Make sure they do a light sketch first on their paper, as planning for whites and highlights are essential, particularly if they want to draw something realistic. I have my students start with an abstract piece until they are comfortable with different techniques of watercolor.

tip #3

COLOR APPLICATION. There are many ways to apply color and depending on the area you want to cover can depend on the medium you use. If you have a large area to cover, have your students use broad tipped markers to lay down color. …

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